Perchtoldsdorf Castle

Perchtoldsdorf, Austria

Perchtoldsdorf Castle probably was laid out before 1000 AD, part of a chain of fortifications along the eastern rim of the Vienna Woods. One Lord Heinricus de Pertoldesdorf was mentioned in an 1138 deed, during the Babenberg rule. Their Perchtoldsdorf vassals continued to rule from the castle even when the Babenberg dynasty became extinct in 1246.

The conflict between the Habsburg emperor Frederick III and his younger brother Archduke Albert VI of Austria started an unstable period in the region. In 1446, many homes in the town were burned during the invasion of the Hungarian regent John Hunyadi. During this time, the castle was occupied by various rival forces, including mercenaries of King Matthias Corvinus from 1477 until about 1490, when Frederick's son King Maximilian I re-established Habsburg control over the area. This turbulent period interrupted the construction of the tower house (Wehrturm), the town's landmark with a height of 60 metres. The tower and other fortifications permitted a successful defense of the city against the Ottoman troops during the 1529 Siege of Vienna, while the surrounding area was devastated.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nicholas Nichols (7 months ago)
Great place for a laid back atmosphere with great drinks and an even better surrounding of people. Probably the best bar in Perchtoldsdorf
Tomaz Papez (7 months ago)
Nice and cosy.
Stefano Torchio (9 months ago)
Nice and pitoresque austrian old village centre with a beautiful Church and the medieval tower. The entire central place is very pretty with very old buildings facing on it.
Jakob Loudon (13 months ago)
Beautiful view
Andreas Heschl (2 years ago)
Great Location for private events
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