Possibly built on the foundations of a Roman castrum fortress, the Moosham castle was first documented in a 1191 deed. It was seized by the Prince-Archbishops of Salzburg about 1285 and from the 14th century onwards served as the residence of an episcopal burgrave. Under the rule of Prince-Archbishop Leonhard von Keutschach from 1495, the castle was rebuilt and extended. In 1520 it became an administrative seat of the Lungau region and was besieged during the German Peasants' War of 1524–25. Archbishop Wolf Dietrich Raitenau stayed here on his flight from Salzburg in October 1611, shortly before he was captured.

Archbishop Count Hieronymus von Colloredo dissolved the Moosham bailiwick in 1790, whereafter the castle decayed. In 1886 the Austrian explorer and patron of the arts Count Johann Nepomuk Wilczek purchased the ruin and had it restored. Up to today the complex is a private property, though its rooms featuring Wilczek's extensive art collection are accessible to the public.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Suvendu Das (20 months ago)
The castle Moosham in 1191 First documentary evidence of a castle of the Lords of Moosham. In the midst of the Lungau, which is surrounded by high mountains, rises above the valley of the Mur on a rocky hill of the wooded Mitterberg the legendary Moosham Castle. Located on the background of ancient history in the heart of Lungau, the castle is a proud witness of the past. Masterfully, it looks down from its high vantage point into the valley of the Mur. Immediately at his feet, covering the moorland, the marshy moor, shortly called "moss", from which the castle also gets its name, spreads out. Immersed in oppressive, gloomy silence, the moor, unfathomable and mysterious, seeks to lure the wanderer ignorant of the way ...... Sometimes muffled, fur-sounding bells ringing from the depths of the moors echo to the wandering ear of the Wanderer , It comes from the sunken city that lies buried down there. From Moosham Castle you can enjoy a delightful panoramic view, which extends from the southwest Aineck on St. Margarethen and the border region lying behind it, the Styrian-Carinthian Alps, towards the east, over Unternberg and Tamsweg out. Castle Moosham has a long, colorful past. Its origin dates back to Roman times! The stones of the castle are from the Roman settlement discovered at the castle. Just like the Roman capitals, which were found during the reconstruction of the castle in the eighties. Also the Roman road, which came from Carinthia through the Leißnitzgraben over the moss to Mauterndorf, leads past here. The legend also tells of a Roman fort that was supposed to have stood in place of the present castle. Ritter von Koch Sternfeld describes Moosham as a Roman plant, as its military center or military square. In the early Middle Ages appears the family Moosheimer, whose name bears the castle. Otto von Saurau, Vogt of the possessions of the abbey Admont for Lungau, got the castle in 1281. Archbishop Friedrich II von Walchen, a loyal supporter of Emperor Rudolf of Habsburg, forced the cocky vassals to submit. The castle then passed to Otto von Moosheim, whose owner he probably was earlier. However, this soon rose against his country, Archbishop Rudolf von Hoheneck and inflicted great harm to him in a feud. For his breach of faith, he lost all his possessions, including his ancestral castle, 1285. From now on, the power and reputation of this family declined, although it existed for more than 400 years. The Moosheimer were only in possession of inferior fiefs and had, inter alia, the jurisdiction (castle hat) on the castles Ramingstein and Klauseck held.
Dackelone Bimmerpost (2 years ago)
A cool old castle.
Brian Keehn (3 years ago)
This is a smaller, very well preserved castle with a very cool museum inside. This castle is supposedly haunted and was on a TV documentary and you can see it on YouTube. Very cool history!!
Andrea Volpini (3 years ago)
This is the best castle that we visited in Salzburgerland (and believe me the competition is fierce). Its authenticity and the glamorous old man that inhabits the property and guides you on tour, along with the precious and eclectic art collection makes it a really unique experience.
Livia Patta (3 years ago)
Privately owned, hosts a rich collection of furnishings, books, costumes and art from the sixteenth century onwards. The guided tour leads the visitor through a flight of rooms of great charm, there's a lot to see and to admire. I would say it's definitely not to be missed. We went there with two small children (1 and almost 3), be prepared to carry them on you. There are no kids-specific-attractions as you may find in many other places in Austria, but again the sheer awesomeness of this castle is sure to impress the little ones too.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Charlottenburg Palace

Charlottenburg Palace is the largest palace in Berlin and the only surviving royal residence in the city dating back to the time of the Hohenzollern family. The original palace was commissioned by Sophie Charlotte, the wife of Friedrich III, Elector of Brandenburg in what was then the village of Lietzow. Originally named Lietzenburg, the palace was designed by Johann Arnold Nering in baroque style. The inauguration of the palace was celebrated on 11 July 1699, Frederick's 42nd birthday.

Friedrich crowned himself as King Friedrich I in Prussia in 1701 (Friedrich II, known as Frederick the Great, would later achieve the title King of Prussia). Two years previously, he had appointed Johann Friedrich von Eosander (also known as Eosander von Göthe) as the royal architect and sent him to study architectural developments in Italy and France, particularly the Palace of Versailles. On his return in 1702, Eosander began to extend the palace, starting with two side wings to enclose a large courtyard, and the main palace was extended on both sides. Sophie Charlotte died in 1705 and Friedrich named the palace and its estate Charlottenburg in her memory. In the following years, the Orangery was built on the west of the palace and the central area was extended with a large domed tower and a larger vestibule. On top of the dome is a wind vane in the form of a gilded statue representing Fortune designed by Andreas Heidt. The Orangery was originally used to overwinter rare plants. During the summer months, when over 500 orange, citrus and sour orange trees decorated the baroque garden, the Orangery regularly was the gorgeous scene of courtly festivities.

Inside the palace, was a room described as 'the eighth wonder of the world', the Amber Room, a room with its walls surfaced in decorative amber. It was designed by Andreas Schlüter and its construction by the Danish amber craftsman Gottfried Wolfram started in 1701. Friedrich Wilhelm I gave the Amber Room to Tsar Peter the Great as a present in 1716.

When Friedrich I died in 1713, he was succeeded by his son, Friedrich Wilhelm I whose building plans were less ambitious, although he did ensure that the building was properly maintained. Building was resumed after his son Friedrich II (Frederick the Great) came to the throne in 1740. During that year, stables for his personal guard regiment were completed to the south of the Orangery wing and work was started on the east wing. The building of the new wing was supervised by Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff, the Superintendent of all the Royal Palaces, who largely followed Eosander's design. The decoration of the exterior was relatively simple but the interior furnishings were lavish. The ground floor was intended for Frederick's wife Elisabeth Christine, who, preferring Schönhausen Palace, was only an occasional visitor. The decoration of the upper floor, which included the White Hall, the Banqueting Hall, the Throne Room and the Golden Gallery, was lavish and was designed mainly by Johann August Nahl. In 1747, a second apartment for the king was prepared in the distant eastern part of the wing. During this time, Sanssouci was being built at Potsdam and once this was completed Frederick was only an occasional visitor to Charlottenburg.

In 1786, Frederick was succeeded by his nephew Friedrich Wilhelm II who transformed five rooms on the ground floor of the east wing into his summer quarters and part of the upper floor into Winter Chambers, although he did not live long enough to use them. His son, Friedrich Wilhelm III came to the throne in 1797 and reigned with his wife, Queen Luise for 43 years. They spent much of this time living in the east wing of Charlottenburg. Their eldest son, Friedrich Wilhelm IV, who reigned from 1840 to 1861, lived in the upper storey of the central palace building. After Friedrich Wilhelm IV died, the only other royal resident of the palace was Friedrich III who reigned for 99 days in 1888.

The palace was badly damaged in 1943 during the Second World War. In 1951, the war-damaged Stadtschloss in East Berlin was demolished and, as the damage to Charlottenburg was at least as serious, it was feared that it would also be demolished. However, following the efforts of Margarete Kühn, the Director of the State Palaces and Gardens, it was rebuilt to its former condition, with gigantic modern ceiling paintings by Hann Trier.

The garden was designed in 1697 in baroque style by Simeon Godeau who had been influenced by André Le Nôtre, designer of the gardens at Versailles. Godeau's design consisted of geometric patterns, with avenues and moats, which separated the garden from its natural surroundings. Beyond the formal gardens was the Carp Pond. Towards the end of the 18th century, a less formal, more natural-looking garden design became fashionable. In 1787 the Royal Gardener Georg Steiner redesigned the garden in the English landscape style for Friedrich Wilhelm II, the work being directed by Peter Joseph Lenné. After the Second World War, the centre of the garden was restored to its previous baroque style.