Possibly built on the foundations of a Roman castrum fortress, the Moosham castle was first documented in a 1191 deed. It was seized by the Prince-Archbishops of Salzburg about 1285 and from the 14th century onwards served as the residence of an episcopal burgrave. Under the rule of Prince-Archbishop Leonhard von Keutschach from 1495, the castle was rebuilt and extended. In 1520 it became an administrative seat of the Lungau region and was besieged during the German Peasants' War of 1524–25. Archbishop Wolf Dietrich Raitenau stayed here on his flight from Salzburg in October 1611, shortly before he was captured.

Archbishop Count Hieronymus von Colloredo dissolved the Moosham bailiwick in 1790, whereafter the castle decayed. In 1886 the Austrian explorer and patron of the arts Count Johann Nepomuk Wilczek purchased the ruin and had it restored. Up to today the complex is a private property, though its rooms featuring Wilczek's extensive art collection are accessible to the public.

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Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

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Suvendu Das (2 years ago)
The castle Moosham in 1191 First documentary evidence of a castle of the Lords of Moosham. In the midst of the Lungau, which is surrounded by high mountains, rises above the valley of the Mur on a rocky hill of the wooded Mitterberg the legendary Moosham Castle. Located on the background of ancient history in the heart of Lungau, the castle is a proud witness of the past. Masterfully, it looks down from its high vantage point into the valley of the Mur. Immediately at his feet, covering the moorland, the marshy moor, shortly called "moss", from which the castle also gets its name, spreads out. Immersed in oppressive, gloomy silence, the moor, unfathomable and mysterious, seeks to lure the wanderer ignorant of the way ...... Sometimes muffled, fur-sounding bells ringing from the depths of the moors echo to the wandering ear of the Wanderer , It comes from the sunken city that lies buried down there. From Moosham Castle you can enjoy a delightful panoramic view, which extends from the southwest Aineck on St. Margarethen and the border region lying behind it, the Styrian-Carinthian Alps, towards the east, over Unternberg and Tamsweg out. Castle Moosham has a long, colorful past. Its origin dates back to Roman times! The stones of the castle are from the Roman settlement discovered at the castle. Just like the Roman capitals, which were found during the reconstruction of the castle in the eighties. Also the Roman road, which came from Carinthia through the Leißnitzgraben over the moss to Mauterndorf, leads past here. The legend also tells of a Roman fort that was supposed to have stood in place of the present castle. Ritter von Koch Sternfeld describes Moosham as a Roman plant, as its military center or military square. In the early Middle Ages appears the family Moosheimer, whose name bears the castle. Otto von Saurau, Vogt of the possessions of the abbey Admont for Lungau, got the castle in 1281. Archbishop Friedrich II von Walchen, a loyal supporter of Emperor Rudolf of Habsburg, forced the cocky vassals to submit. The castle then passed to Otto von Moosheim, whose owner he probably was earlier. However, this soon rose against his country, Archbishop Rudolf von Hoheneck and inflicted great harm to him in a feud. For his breach of faith, he lost all his possessions, including his ancestral castle, 1285. From now on, the power and reputation of this family declined, although it existed for more than 400 years. The Moosheimer were only in possession of inferior fiefs and had, inter alia, the jurisdiction (castle hat) on the castles Ramingstein and Klauseck held.
Dackelone Bimmerpost (3 years ago)
A cool old castle.
Brian Keehn (4 years ago)
This is a smaller, very well preserved castle with a very cool museum inside. This castle is supposedly haunted and was on a TV documentary and you can see it on YouTube. Very cool history!!
Andrea Volpini (4 years ago)
This is the best castle that we visited in Salzburgerland (and believe me the competition is fierce). Its authenticity and the glamorous old man that inhabits the property and guides you on tour, along with the precious and eclectic art collection makes it a really unique experience.
Livia Patta (4 years ago)
Privately owned, hosts a rich collection of furnishings, books, costumes and art from the sixteenth century onwards. The guided tour leads the visitor through a flight of rooms of great charm, there's a lot to see and to admire. I would say it's definitely not to be missed. We went there with two small children (1 and almost 3), be prepared to carry them on you. There are no kids-specific-attractions as you may find in many other places in Austria, but again the sheer awesomeness of this castle is sure to impress the little ones too.
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