Villach castle was first mentioned in 1270 and built probably in 1233. There are still remains of original tower and north wall. The existing castle was built in the 16th century and remodelled several times after that. The chapel dates from the 14th century. Today there is a exhibition of archaeological foundings.

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Address

Burgplatz 1, Villach, Austria
See all sites in Villach

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kyle Mika (2 years ago)
Great expierence. It might be hard to understand for others since it's all in German, but the show was spectacular and funny! I was here in 2011 and after 9 years, it still did not disappoint.
Marieke Hannen (2 years ago)
Entrance is cash only... So after 30 minutes in line you can turn back. Very corona unfriendly to handle all that cash. Plus it's 2020.. Come on. It would be nice to mention on your website that there's a additional parking fee plus cash needed.
Luke smolders (2 years ago)
There are no Corona / COVID 19 measurements in place! Way to much people can enter. The birds are in small cages. Atm this should be closed, in order to protect people's health. Pro's: show presenters are very enthousiastic.
Caroline Chevillotte (2 years ago)
Very interesting and informative experience! You can enjoy the beauty of eagles and falcons flying over the castle. The team is professional and you can feel they're very passionate about what they do. They share a lot of stories and information about birds, eagles and falconry. The money goes to the castle's animal clinic.
Bálint Sólyom (2 years ago)
Very unique experience - much more interesting than just seeing the birds in a zoo. The presenter is also good (it is in german of course). Seemed like the birds also enjoyed the play, so luckily not a circus-like thing.
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