Heidenreichstein Castle

Heidenreichstein, Austria

The colossal Heidenreichstein castle situated in the moorlands to the northwest of the Waldviertel is the largest and best preserved medieval water castle in Lower Austria. The oldest parts of the castle are dated back to the 12th century. It has never been in enemy hands since its construction. The walls of the four wings, the three corner turrets and the keep are up to four metres thick. A guided tour through the three-storey living apartments with spiral staircase and arcades discloses highly remarkable interior fittings including Gothic furniture, articles of daily life and portrait paintings.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Miriam (ageekmaybe) (14 months ago)
Unfortunately I was too late for the last tour, but the castle looks really well kept from the outside and I will for sure try to go again to have a look inside ☺️
Andras F (17 months ago)
Fans of medieval castles will love Burg Heidenreichstein. The guided tour is very informative and you learn how life was on the castle many hundreds of years ago.
L Fillipe (2 years ago)
This is one of the hidden jems arond the castles in Austria. Especially magnificent scenery during autumn and spring.
Letz Otto (2 years ago)
Burgführung top
Štěpán Kněžek (2 years ago)
Very beautiful place. Visit recommended.
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