Dürnstein Castle Ruins

Dürnstein, Austria

The city of Dürnstein and Dürnstein castle ruin are connected by a wall. The castle was built between 1140-1145 by Hadmar I Kuenring and blasted by Sweden under General Torstenson in 1645. You can see a model of the city and the ruins at Dürnstein Abbey.

Dürnstein castle is known from the legend about Richard the Lionheart. The legend tells, that the English King Richard the Lionheart tore up the Austrian flag on the return journey of his crusade and refused to share the spoils of war with Leopold V. Sure, Leopold V. held the English king in the castle 1192-1193. The Royal prisoner could receive travelling singer (troubadours) for his entertainment, resulted in probably later the legend of Blondel singer. His faithful minstrel moved from Castle to Castle, until he discovered his King in Dürnstein, by singing a song verse, the prisoner added. Richard the Lionheart was released after a ransom of 150,000 Silver marks in freedom.

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Details

Founded: 1140-1145
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.duernstein.at

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Suha Shakaa (12 months ago)
You can get a nice view up there but don’t stop halfway. The scenery from the top is even better
Bites Teodor (12 months ago)
an incredible little town, probably the most romantic place on the Danube. It is worth visiting, my personal opinion, a small corner of heaven.wine, snap, 1000 things made from apricot to soap, do not forget wine jam
v l (2 years ago)
Nice walk up along the vineyards. So pretty. View of Danube and valley is amazing.
Georgia Little (2 years ago)
We explored the old town within the castle walls and enjoyed the beauty of the church, then we hiked up to the top of the castle ruins. It’s a 30 minute walk but basically vertical. It was so beautiful to see the Wachau Valley from up high. All the villages along the river are so beautiful it’s like a fairy tale.
Margaret Princep (2 years ago)
Absolutely breathtaking views up and down the Danube. Well worth the effort of walking up there. Make sure you wear sturdy shoes. Lots of steps. A beautiful strenuous walk.
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