Güssing Castle

Güssing, Austria

Established around 1157, Burg Güssing is the oldest castle in Burgenland. In 1524, Francis I, Batthyány (1497–1566) received it and the associated lands. The family still retains ownership.

Times changed and due to the modernization of warfare, the castle and fortress of Güssing slowly lost its strategic importance. In 1777 all guns were removed. Due to the high cost of maintenance and the introduced “roof tax” by empress Maria Theresia, there was a partial demolition of some of the castles fortifications.

In 1870 Prince Philipp Batthyány-Strattmann established a foundation for the preservation of the castle and monastery as an historic structure. However, in the years following World War I, foundation had lost most of its money due to inflation and the costs of war.

Today, the castle acts as a tourist attraction in addition to being an important historical structure. Theater performances, concerts and readings can be attended on the castle grounds during the summer months, and there is a family museum located within.

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Details

Founded: c. 1157
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Peter Marusa (12 months ago)
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Lajos Pinter (13 months ago)
Beautiful old castle. Very friendly staff, but you cannot pay with card
Walter Foith (13 months ago)
One of Austria's oldest castle. Interesting historic material on display. Once up there - enjoy a terrific view!
bernhard migas (15 months ago)
Very nice old ruin of a castle with a nice restaurant there, try the grilled green asparagus in bacon
Judit Zsigmond (18 months ago)
Magical castle with splendid view & excellent restaurant. It is worth visiting this place/Varàzslatos kastèly gyönyörü kilàtàssal es nagyon jò ètteremmel
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