Jurisics Castle

Kőszeg, Hungary

Jurisics Castle, named after Croatian nobleman Nikola Jurišić. The oldest part was built in the 13th century. The inner castle originally of Gothic style was extended later on. This building complex served as an estate castle and was also converted in the Renaissance and Baroque era. The character of the two islands still can be observed: it is visible that the fortress and the interior of the castle were surrounded by a moat.

During the Little War in Hungary, Pargalı İbrahim Pasha under the command of Suleiman the Magnificent laid siege to the castle in 1532. Jurišić and less than 1000 men defended the castle for 25 days without any artillery, despite 19 assaults.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Hungary

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

István Kálmán (2 years ago)
Csodálatos a vár és az egész környezet. Nem voltak nagyon sokan amikor mi voltunk így sokkal jobb volt. Az alkalmazottak nagyon kedvesek és segítőkészek. A vár védő macska nagyon aranyos volt alkalmunk vele találkozni és a külső részen sétált is velünk kicsit. A toronyban 4szer harangoztunk szóval visszatérünk
Dr. Amir Mosavi (3 years ago)
Very nice castle.
Mehmet Tokgöz (3 years ago)
Nice and quiet place
Bernadett Davies (3 years ago)
Love this place! I love museums anyways... This one is a lot of reading and tabloids on the wall with history in a fairly small but old castle. There are some quirky bits, like the lookout tower (I have vertigo, so only the hubby went up there with the older kids), rung the tower bell. If you go, although it costs a bit extra, it is worth watching the 3D movie about Hungarian history. For tourists it gives a really good summary, for Hungarians it is a cool short film to remind one of the school taught facts and stories. The best time to visit is the beginning of August, when there is a historical fair in the whole of the city centre, called Ostromnapok. It lasts the whole weekend and you can time travel back into the Middle Ages - eat the food, listen to the music, play the medival games or witness the re-enacting of the Hungarian-Turkish fights of 1500s with lots of soldiers and even cannon shots, the castle being the centre of attention. You can also buy memorabilia in this Mediterranean feel gem of a place.
Barnabas Soos (4 years ago)
Nice historical place
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