Ortenburg Castle Ruins

Baldramsdorf, Austria

Ortenburg castle was erected in the late 11th century by ministeriales of the Bavarian Prince-Bishops of Freising, who then held large possessions in the Duchy of Carinthia. Their descendants began to call themselves Counts of Ortenburg. The castle is located on the northern slope of the Gailtal Alps overlooking the Drava valley.

Damaged by the 1348 Friuli earthquake, the significance of the castle diminuished after the extinction of the Ortenburgs in 1418. The estates were inherited by Count Hermann II of Celje and in 1456 finally seized by the Imperial House of Habsburg. In 1524 the comital title passed to Gabriel von Salamanca, who had his new residence, Porcia castle built in the nearby town of Spittal an der Drau.

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Baldramsdorf, Austria
See all sites in Baldramsdorf

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Thomas Luft (18 months ago)
Eine sehr schöne Burgruine, die man sich anschauen sollte. Außerdem hat man noch einen tollen Ausblick in das Tal.
Mister Rabbit (2 years ago)
Sehr schöne Ruine
Martina Rud (2 years ago)
Tolle alte Burgruine mit Blick über Spittal und bei Schönwetter nach Gmünd; Villach bis hin zum Glockner
sophia dalmatiner (2 years ago)
一座廢棄的城堡。 夏季適合登山健行、腳踏車。城堡附近有一間農家餐廳,也有兒童遊戲空間。
NO SI (3 years ago)
Ein schöner Platz, herrlicher Ausblick!
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