Sanctuary of Mount Lussari

Borgo Lussari, Italy

The easternmost peaks of the Alps have been the natural border between the Latin, German and Slav worlds since time immemorial. Today, in a time of peace, they still speak the languages of these peoples and their valleys are places of friendship and cooperation.

Attracting pilgrims from three lands, the shrine of Monte Lussari, in the northeastern corner of Italy, is truly European and a symbol of this peaceful coexistence. According to ancient folklore, the sanctuary has its origins in 1360 following a series of miraculous events: a shepherd found sheep from his flock kneeling around a bush. With amazement, he realised that a statuette of the Virgin and Child was at the centre of the bush. The shepherd gave it to the priest of Camporosso, but the following morning, the statue was found on Lussari with the kneeling sheep surrounding it again. The event repeated itself a third time. Having been informed, the Patriarch of Aquileia ordered that a chapel be built on the spot.

There is no trace left of the original chapel; the current building is the result of the restoration and extension of a 16th Century building. The sanctuary is accessible by foot via the picturesque Sentiero del Pellegrino (Pilgrim’s Path) that winds through the forest of Tarvisio, or with the cable car from Camporosso.

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Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.turismofvg.it

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4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Puppat (12 months ago)
If you are brave, you can hiking from down valley Camporosso and take the Sentiero del Pelegrino to reach Monte Lussari. If you can survive 1100mts level march that includes now snow and cold doing it in 2 ways you will do almost 13km path that will full you of joy.
Alex Puppat (12 months ago)
If you are brave, you can hiking from down valley Camporosso and take the Sentiero del Pelegrino to reach Monte Lussari. If you can survive 1100mts level march that includes now snow and cold doing it in 2 ways you will do almost 13km path that will full you of joy.
Pierluigi Avvanzo (2 years ago)
It's a nice place the last stronghold of Italy
Pierluigi Avvanzo (2 years ago)
It's a nice place the last stronghold of Italy
Filip Strzelecki (2 years ago)
Beautiful church with paintings and frescoes. Mess is in 3 languages: Italian, Slovenian and German
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