Rothenthurn Castle

Spittal an der Drau, Austria

Rothenthurn ('red tower') castle may have existed since the 11th century. It was an estate of the Counts of Ortenburg and their successors, the Counts of Celje. A castle is documented in 1478, when the area was held by the Meinhardiner House of Gorizia. The present-day Renaissance building with its chapel was erected from the early 16th onwards, it was acquired by Christoph Khevenhüller about 1525 and afterwards in the possession of several local nobles over the centuries. Today the owners run the castle as a lodging establishment.

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Founded: 11th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

de.wikipedia.org

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dieter Meschke (3 years ago)
Unfortunately, the castle is not open to the general public for tours.
Anton Schaubach (4 years ago)
Boss is of noble origin, family is very nice!
Robby Roberto (4 years ago)
Magical place, the Schloss Rothenthurn castle dominates the valley, behind it has magnificent woods, the b & b run directly by the barons Maria and Georg di Pereira Arnestein is really excellent, a dip in the past with a lot of relaxation on the banks of the lake animated by a lively fountain.
Alexander Tacoli (4 years ago)
Anyone who loves history is really cared for here by Baron and Baroness, you immediately feel safe
Vincenzo (4 years ago)
A place to relax! A dream
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