Ottenstein Castle

Ottenstein, Austria

The mighty shingle-covered cone and hipped roofs of Ottenstein Castle are an impressive sight. Antique fairs, art and other special exhibitions are regularly held in the castle. Of particular interest to art-lovers is the Romanesque castle chapel with vaulted ceilings decorated with monumental frescos dating back to about 1170. There is also a restaurant.

One of Ottenstein family members was first mentioned in 1177, but the castle is probably older. Ottenstein family owned the castle until the 15th century. In 1516 the castle came into the possession of Paul Stodoligk. Under his son Eustach numerous extensions were carried out. During the Thirty Years' War the castle was besieged two times, in 1622 and 1640 without success.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Austria

More Information

www.waldviertel.at

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

FRANZISKA LORBEER (11 months ago)
A place of unparalleled hospitality embedded in bucolic scenery and within arms reach of several castles that are worth the visit. Jewel of the hotel is the bowling alley with its outstanding service and atmosphere!
Abel V (11 months ago)
We had an amazing time, and Szabi is the best bar tender ever. The service is generally very accommodating and flexible!
Veronica Murphy (3 years ago)
Great place
Joseph Walker (3 years ago)
Very friendly staff. Clean. Good traditional food in the restaurant. Class banter all around to be honest. Plus it's only a stones throw away from the Lake. Come here every year for work and never disappointed. Still don't like Eiernockerl though.
Michael Ludwig (4 years ago)
Wie jedes Jahr sehr zufrieden Freundliches Personal Super Essen Schöne und saubere Zimmer Was will man mehr? Freue mich auf nächstes Jahr wenn ich wieder hier bin.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.