Château du Plessis Josso

Theix, France

The Château du Plessis-Josso is a fortified 14th century manor house. It is open for tours during the summer, and offers its main hall for hosting events and marriages as well as a small country cottage outside the enclosing walls.

Well-preserved and partially inhabited, the manor-house stands next to a large pond. This feudal Breton ensemble still has its fortified enceinte with towers and crenellated walls that protected it from the armed gangs and pillagers who were operating in the region during the Hundred Years' War and later during the Wars of Religion of the 16th century.

Built around 1330 by Sylvestre Josso, squire of the Duke Jean III during the turbulent period of the Breton War of Succession in the 14th century, it passed next by a powerful alliance to the Rosmadec family and served as a residence for dignitaries such as a bishop, sénéchaux and the governors of various Breton towns. In the late 18th century it became the property of the Le Mintier de Léhélec family who still live there today.

Plessis-Josso, like all 15th century manors in Brittany, had especially an agricultural function as the head of a domaine of 1,500 hectares spread over several parishes and a with population of nearly 500 inhabitants. It had several mills, baker's ovens, a chapel and a small private port in the Gulf of Morbihan. Its role was therefore political, economic and administrative.

Architecture

This medieval site is composed of several sections of varying architectural styles and eras: the main corps de logis dating from the 15th century with its Gothic dormer windows, a 16th-century Renaissance pavilion, Classical 17th century outbuildings, and a complete enclosing wall whose corner tower defended the access road that spans the causeway, between the lake and the mill.

The ground-floor hall has a very beautiful example of a crédence de justice (wall-cupboard built directly into the stone wall) that was used by the lord of the manor to place books and documents relating to the administration of the manor-court.

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Address

Le Plessis, Theix, France
See all sites in Theix

Details

Founded: c. 1330
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Valois Dynasty and Hundred Year's War (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jose maria Aulotte (13 months ago)
"The Chateau du Plessis Josso would make anyone in love with Brittany" recently wrote to us one of the guests at our son's wedding. How better to sum up all the very positive opinions we received after this reception! All this was greatly facilitated by the excellent welcome of the whole Salmon Legagneur family in a magnificent setting. A week later, we were also invited there and the magic again worked. Well done !
Pat Khan (15 months ago)
Very well qd open
aubry aubry (2 years ago)
Interesting. Good welcome. Well maintained.
Marina (2 years ago)
Very interesting visit (thank you Solène) and very beautiful manor. Too bad not to visit more rooms.
ORVAIN Cindy (2 years ago)
Very interesting guided tour with Solène. We discover life on the side of the Breton lords through this manor. This changes the traditional fortified castles.
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