Château du Plessis Josso

Theix, France

The Château du Plessis-Josso is a fortified 14th century manor house. It is open for tours during the summer, and offers its main hall for hosting events and marriages as well as a small country cottage outside the enclosing walls.

Well-preserved and partially inhabited, the manor-house stands next to a large pond. This feudal Breton ensemble still has its fortified enceinte with towers and crenellated walls that protected it from the armed gangs and pillagers who were operating in the region during the Hundred Years' War and later during the Wars of Religion of the 16th century.

Built around 1330 by Sylvestre Josso, squire of the Duke Jean III during the turbulent period of the Breton War of Succession in the 14th century, it passed next by a powerful alliance to the Rosmadec family and served as a residence for dignitaries such as a bishop, sénéchaux and the governors of various Breton towns. In the late 18th century it became the property of the Le Mintier de Léhélec family who still live there today.

Plessis-Josso, like all 15th century manors in Brittany, had especially an agricultural function as the head of a domaine of 1,500 hectares spread over several parishes and a with population of nearly 500 inhabitants. It had several mills, baker's ovens, a chapel and a small private port in the Gulf of Morbihan. Its role was therefore political, economic and administrative.

Architecture

This medieval site is composed of several sections of varying architectural styles and eras: the main corps de logis dating from the 15th century with its Gothic dormer windows, a 16th-century Renaissance pavilion, Classical 17th century outbuildings, and a complete enclosing wall whose corner tower defended the access road that spans the causeway, between the lake and the mill.

The ground-floor hall has a very beautiful example of a crédence de justice (wall-cupboard built directly into the stone wall) that was used by the lord of the manor to place books and documents relating to the administration of the manor-court.

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Address

Le Plessis, Theix, France
See all sites in Theix

Details

Founded: c. 1330
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Captain Arawak (2 years ago)
Le manoir est un ensemble de constructions qui s'étalent du XIVème au XVIIème siècle. La visite permet de comprendre l'extension progressive du manoir au fil des siècles. Propriété de la famille Le Mintier de Lehelec, il est bien conservé. Cependant il est peu meublé.
Michel Venet (2 years ago)
La passionnante histoire de ce manoir nous fut conté par un guide fort érudit en cette journée du patrimoine. Cette histoire commence en 1330 voyez vous... Pour le reste ouvrez vos oreilles et laissez parler les guides de visite de l'office du tourisme! Superbe endroit, dommage que la viste du jardin se limite à un verger clos de murs ainsi que les fleurs artificielles delavées ça et là...
Marie Grandin-feiertag (2 years ago)
Belle découverte que la visite de ce manoir. Nous avons eu un guide qui connaissait bien l'histoire du lieu mais également la vie à cette période. Très intéressant, dans un cadre calme et plein de sérénité.
Claude Le Goupil (2 years ago)
OK
Mathilde LF (2 years ago)
Un lieu unique et merveilleux pour y faire son mariage (ce qui justifie les 4 étoiles), une cour incroyable et une salle de dîner atypique merveilleuse... à condition: 1/ D'avoir du beau temps 2/ De se coller un énorme ménage la veille de son mariage pour enlever les toiles d'araignées, aspirer la poussière et nettoyer le sol dégouttant de la salle 3/ De se dire qu'il faut être zen car il n'y a aucun suivi et aucune présence sur place et qu'il est très difficile de les joindre 4/ D'accepter de ne pas avoir les clés du lieu de réception que vous avez loué Néanmoins, notre mariage fut grandiose et en grand partie grâce à ce super site.
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