Vannes City Walls

Vannes, France

In the third century AD, the city of Vannes, called Darioritum, acquires the right to fortify. Thus, west of the Gallo-Roman city, a castrum was built. During the Middle Ages, the castrum becomes the centre of the city. Extended in the 14th century, it is reinforced in the 15th century. Over the following two centuries, the ramparts are modernised with the construction of the Garenne buttress. Several medieval gates has been survived, like Tour du Connétable and Château de l'Hermine (former castle, transformed into a palace in the 17th century). Today there is a nice view from the park Jardins des Remparts to the walls.

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Address

Rue du Rempart, Vannes, France
See all sites in Vannes

Details

Founded: 14-15th centuries
Category: Castles and fortifications in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

More Information

structurae.net

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Carlos Soto (12 months ago)
Nice place for a stroll in britanny
gregory olivier (12 months ago)
Vannes is a charming and beautiful town. The center has its traditional Brittany spirit. During the season’s greetings the city was illuminated and we had the chance to do free ice skating. Thanks to Vannes.
John Garner (2 years ago)
Brilliant place. Well worth a visit. We had only a morning there but had a good walk around. Plenty to see. Gardens are beaitiful and very well kept.
Beverley Howarth (2 years ago)
Facilities need sorting out only 2 toilets available during our stay other doors locked and they were communal
Robert (2 years ago)
A beautiful area nicely maintained and well worth walking around. The old way houses on the edge of the river are a delight and you should take time to see them. The gardens are nicely laid out and give a haven of tranquillity. It would be nice to be able to walk more of the walls but at least part of it is accessible.
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