Château de Trécesson

Trécesson, France

The imposing reddish schist walls of Château de Trécesson are reflected in the waters of the lake which surrounds it. The front gate is reached by a bridge which spans the moat. The entry is guarded by an imposing gatehouse flanked by two narrow towers on corbelling, joined together by an old gallery with machicolations. On the right, a long almost windowless frontage, covered with a steep slate roof, ends in a hexagonal corner tower. Around the trapezoidal inner courtyard, to the right is a corps de logis of more recent vintage, undoubtedly 18th century; and on the left stand the domestic buildings, protected by a watchtower on the exterior facade, and a small 15th century seigneurial chapel.

The origin of Trécesson castle is lost in the mists of time. It was mentioned as the seat of the lords of Ploërmel and Campénéac from the 8th century. The Trécesson family is documented since the 13th century and its first known representative was the knight Jean de Trécesson, whose grandson was Constable of Brittany in the 14th century. Tradition places the construction of the site at the end of the 14th century, but it is more probable that the castle, in its present position, dates from the 15th century. At that time, around 1440, the last Trécesson heiress married Éon de Carné. He and his son François added the name of Trécesson to their own and undertook the transformation and rebuilding of the château.

The residence remained the property of the Carné-Trécesson family until 1773, when the last of that line, Agathe de Trécesson, married Rene-Joseph Le Preste de Châteaugiron. The château passed in 1793 to Nicolas Bourelle de Sivry, and subsequently to the Perrien, Montesquieu and the Prunelé families. The countess de Prunelé lives in the château today.

In June 1793, during the Reign of Terror following the French Revolution, the Girondist deputy Jacques Defermon (known as Defermon des Chapelières), having signed a protest against the exclusion of the Gironde faction, was obliged to flee and took refuge in the château, where he remained hidden for over a year.

Today Château de Trécesson is in private use.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yori Schell (4 months ago)
It is a very nice looking castle, but on private property so we coudn't visit it.
Maëlig Thierry (5 months ago)
Beautiful
English Guy in France (RappinRich) (5 months ago)
Nice castle, only able to see outside but still a nice visit.
Michel BORNAND (6 months ago)
Superb castel. Unfortunately, we can only see the outside.
Jennie Mason (2 years ago)
Very beautiful chateau,well worth a look,pity you can't go and look inside.
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