St. Sauveur Basilica

Dinan, France

The construction of St. Sauveur Basilica was commissioned around 1120 by Sir Rivallon le Roux, Lord of Dinan, on his return from the first Crusade. The church was extensively rebuilt and extended during the 15th and 16th centuries and is a successful blend of architectural styles. The lower part of facade is part of the original 12th century building. The bell tower was built during the 18th century to replace the 17th century dome which had been destroyed by lightning.

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Details

Founded: c. 1120
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

www.travelfranceonline.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Andy Chislett-McDonald (4 years ago)
Just go an see it. The whole town is 'chocolate box' pretty.
Brian Anderson (4 years ago)
Amazing windows, well worth a look.
A. Ayres (5 years ago)
A spectacular and atmospheric basilica, one of the highlights of the lovely town of Dinan. It is quite cavernous and dark, but that only adds to the atmospheric nature of the place, and it serves to highlight the stunning and colourful stained glass windows, many of which depict the patron saints of typical professions in the town's history. A delight.
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