The Vasa Museum (Vasamuseet) is a maritime museum displaying the only almost fully intact 17th century ship that has ever been salvaged, the 64-gun warship Vasa that sank on her maiden voyage in 1628. Opened in 1990, the Vasa Museum is one of the most visited museums in Scandinavia.

The main hall contains the ship itself and various exhibits related to the archaeological findings of the ships and early 17th century Sweden. Vasa has been fitted with the lower sections of all three masts, a new bowsprit, winter rigging, and has had certain parts that were missing or heavily damaged replaced. The replacement parts have not been treated or painted and are therefore clearly visible against the original material that has been darkened after three centuries under water.

The new museum is dominated by a large copper roof with stylized masts that represent the actual height of Vasa when she was fully rigged. Parts of the building are covered in wooden panels painted in dark red, blue, tar black, ochre yellow and dark green. The interior is similarly decorated, with large sections of bare, unpainted concrete, including the entire ceiling. Inside the museum the ship can be seen from six levels, from her keel to the very top of the stern castle. Around the ship are numerous exhibits and models portraying the construction, sinking, location and recovery of the ship. There are also exhibits that expand on the history of Sweden in the 17th century, providing background information for why the ship was built. A movie theatre shows a film in alternating languages on the recovery of the Vasa.

The museum also features four other museum ships moored in the harour outside: the ice breaker Sankt Erik (launched 1915), the lightvessel Finngrundet (1903), the torpedo boat Spica (1966) and the rescue boat Bernhard Ingelsson (1944).

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1990
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

adele zhao (19 months ago)
We were a bit skeptical of a museum dedicated to a single ship but it's amazing and way bigger than expected. It has a lot of information on restoration/preservation of the ship as well as what life would have been like plus some cool facial reconstructions. I'd recommend going to the movie and tour included in the ticket. 10/10 worth checking out if you're in Stockholm.
Monika Kolodziejczyk (19 months ago)
Nice place to visit. Impressive view of the ship. Wide opening hours. Small but nice restaurant upstairs. Visit takes up to max. 2 hours. Possible to get there with public transport but also easy walk within 30min.from city centre (main train station). I
Ashwin Sathrughnan (2 years ago)
Beet there twice by now! It’s a well organized museum and has a Swedish minimalistic approach to how the information is organized. I just loved that fact that they have also incorporated technology to demonstrate how it was like during the time when Vasa was being built. If you happen to travel around Stockholm, Vasa should be on the top of the go to places as museum. Furthermore, there are many museums located near Vasa.
Tobias Kiener (2 years ago)
Absolutely amazing. You have to see this. Worth every penny. The picture won't do justice. Unbelievable good work on the preservation and the museum is just gorgeous. It's not a typical museum where you to read long texts for some stuff behind a glass window. It is right in front of you and the view of this ship will take your breath away every single time you look at it
Kathy Miller (2 years ago)
We were not prepared for how WONDERFUL this museum is! Had read about it, but the shear size and workmanship of the Vasa will truly amaze anyone. Allow enough time. There's a lot to read and see. All ages except the very young would enjoy. A very memorable experience.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.