The Vasa Museum (Vasamuseet) is a maritime museum displaying the only almost fully intact 17th century ship that has ever been salvaged, the 64-gun warship Vasa that sank on her maiden voyage in 1628. Opened in 1990, the Vasa Museum is one of the most visited museums in Scandinavia.

The main hall contains the ship itself and various exhibits related to the archaeological findings of the ships and early 17th century Sweden. Vasa has been fitted with the lower sections of all three masts, a new bowsprit, winter rigging, and has had certain parts that were missing or heavily damaged replaced. The replacement parts have not been treated or painted and are therefore clearly visible against the original material that has been darkened after three centuries under water.

The new museum is dominated by a large copper roof with stylized masts that represent the actual height of Vasa when she was fully rigged. Parts of the building are covered in wooden panels painted in dark red, blue, tar black, ochre yellow and dark green. The interior is similarly decorated, with large sections of bare, unpainted concrete, including the entire ceiling. Inside the museum the ship can be seen from six levels, from her keel to the very top of the stern castle. Around the ship are numerous exhibits and models portraying the construction, sinking, location and recovery of the ship. There are also exhibits that expand on the history of Sweden in the 17th century, providing background information for why the ship was built. A movie theatre shows a film in alternating languages on the recovery of the Vasa.

The museum also features four other museum ships moored in the harour outside: the ice breaker Sankt Erik (launched 1915), the lightvessel Finngrundet (1903), the torpedo boat Spica (1966) and the rescue boat Bernhard Ingelsson (1944).

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 1990
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

adele zhao (6 months ago)
We were a bit skeptical of a museum dedicated to a single ship but it's amazing and way bigger than expected. It has a lot of information on restoration/preservation of the ship as well as what life would have been like plus some cool facial reconstructions. I'd recommend going to the movie and tour included in the ticket. 10/10 worth checking out if you're in Stockholm.
Monika Kolodziejczyk (6 months ago)
Nice place to visit. Impressive view of the ship. Wide opening hours. Small but nice restaurant upstairs. Visit takes up to max. 2 hours. Possible to get there with public transport but also easy walk within 30min.from city centre (main train station). I
Ashwin Sathrughnan (7 months ago)
Beet there twice by now! It’s a well organized museum and has a Swedish minimalistic approach to how the information is organized. I just loved that fact that they have also incorporated technology to demonstrate how it was like during the time when Vasa was being built. If you happen to travel around Stockholm, Vasa should be on the top of the go to places as museum. Furthermore, there are many museums located near Vasa.
Tobias Kiener (7 months ago)
Absolutely amazing. You have to see this. Worth every penny. The picture won't do justice. Unbelievable good work on the preservation and the museum is just gorgeous. It's not a typical museum where you to read long texts for some stuff behind a glass window. It is right in front of you and the view of this ship will take your breath away every single time you look at it
Kathy Miller (8 months ago)
We were not prepared for how WONDERFUL this museum is! Had read about it, but the shear size and workmanship of the Vasa will truly amaze anyone. Allow enough time. There's a lot to read and see. All ages except the very young would enjoy. A very memorable experience.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Jelling Runestones

The Jelling stones are massive carved runestones from the 10th century, found at the town of Jelling in Denmark. The older of the two Jelling stones was raised by King Gorm the Old in memory of his wife Thyra. The larger of the two stones was raised by King Gorm's son, Harald Bluetooth in memory of his parents, celebrating his conquest of Denmark and Norway, and his conversion of the Danes to Christianity. The runic inscriptions on these stones are considered the most well known in Denmark.

The Jelling stones stand in the churchyard of Jelling church between two large mounds. The stones represent the transitional period between the indigenous Norse paganism and the process of Christianization in Denmark; the larger stone is often cited as Denmark's baptismal certificate (dåbsattest), containing a depiction of Christ. They are strongly identified with the creation of Denmark as a nation state and both stones feature one of the earliest records of the name 'Danmark'.

After having been exposed to all kinds of weather for a thousand years cracks are beginning to show. On the 15th of November 2008 experts from UNESCO examined the stones to determine their condition. Experts requested that the stones be moved to an indoor exhibition hall, or in some other way protected in situ, to prevent further damage from the weather.

Heritage Agency of Denmark decided to keep the stones in their current location and selected a protective casing design from 157 projects submitted through a competition. The winner of the competition was Nobel Architects. The glass casing creates a climate system that keeps the stones at a fixed temperature and humidity and protects them from weathering. The design features rectangular glass casings strengthened by two solid bronze sides mounted on a supporting steel skeleton. The glass is coated with an anti-reflective material that gives the exhibit a greenish hue. Additionally, the bronze patina gives off a rusty, greenish colour, highlighting the runestones' gray and reddish tones and emphasising their monumental character and significance.