Altare della Patria

Rome, Italy

The Altare della Patria, also known as the National Monument to Victor Emmanuel II, is a monument built in honor of Victor Emmanuel, the first king of a unified Italy.

The eclectic structure was designed by Giuseppe Sacconi in 1885; sculpture for it was parceled out to established sculptors all over Italy, such as Leonardo Bistolfi and Angelo Zanelli. It was inaugurated in 1911 and completed in 1925.

The Vittoriano features stairways, Corinthian columns, fountains, an equestrian sculpture of Victor Emmanuel and two statues of the goddess Victoria riding on quadrigas. The base of the structure houses the museum of Italian Unification. In 2007, a panoramic lift was added to the structure, allowing visitors to ride up to the roof for 360-degree views of Rome.

The monument holds the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier with an eternal flame, built under the statue of goddess Roma after World War I following an idea of General Giulio Douhet.

The monument, the largest in Rome, was controversial since its construction destroyed a large area of the Capitoline Hill with a Medieval neighbourhood for its sake. The monument itself is often regarded as conspicuous, pompous and too large.

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Details

Founded: 1885-1925
Category: Statues in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org
www.rome.net

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tomáš Kosec (14 months ago)
The best part for me was the view from the top of the altar. It is amazing. Whole Rome in front of you. But we almost missed it, because it is little bit hidden.
Michael Filion (14 months ago)
A beautiful and interesting place to visit. There are a lot of stairs, and a long line for the panoramic elevator. I would highly suggest a stop here, but not for people who are less able to handle the stairs. For those who can't handle stairs, you can still get some great photos.
Arjun Subbarao (15 months ago)
Great view of the city from the deck. Go during sunset time for wonderful pictures of the forums and Colosseum. Only reason to not give 5 stars is because the inside of this building is poorly kept. Roof leaks and some minor mold can be seen inside. But I say skip it and go for the view from the deck. Getting there: very easy access to several city bus routes and metro.
Monique Stanfield (15 months ago)
it's beautiful! This place gives great views of rome!!! Highly recommend!!! Its free. There are a few small museum exhibits within it that charge a few dollars to enter. But it's a sight to see for sure. LOTS OF STAIRS to climb to the stop...just a warning.
Jeremiah Forshey (15 months ago)
Came here our first afternoon in Rome, took the elevator to the roof (small charge, free for
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