Arch of Constantine

Rome, Italy

The Arch of Constantine is situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill. It was erected by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine I's victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in 312. Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch. The arch spans the Via triumphalis, the way taken by the emperors when they entered the city in triumph.

Though dedicated to Constantine, much of the decorative material incorporated earlier work from the time of the emperors Trajan (98-117), Hadrian (117-138) and Marcus Aurelius (161-180), and is thus a collage. The last of the existing triumphal arches in Rome, it is also the only one to make extensive use of spolia, reusing several major reliefs from 2nd century imperial monuments, which give a striking and famous stylistic contrast to the sculpture newly created for the arch.

The arch is 21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. Above the archways is placed the attic, composed of brickwork reveted (faced) with marble. A staircase within the arch is entered from a door at some height from the ground, on the west side, facing the Palatine Hill. The general design with a main part structured by detached columns and an attic with the main inscription above is modelled after the example of the Arch of Septimius Severus on the Roman Forum.

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Founded: 315 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Manny Alonzo (16 months ago)
This is a beautiful and historical monument in Rome to commemorate Constantine The Great victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in AD 312. The monument is walking distance from the Colosseum and The Palatine Hill. It is the largest surviving Triumphal Arch of the Roman empire.
Kharmencita Brueckner (17 months ago)
ARCH OF CONSTANTINE- A Monumental Historical Landmark , 21 meters high which was built with three arches where as the central arch wider and higher than the two, that served as passageway through a Triumphal parade. This monument was made to honor and glorify the success after Emperor Constantine's victorious battle at a Bridge against his enemies. The Monument has lots of carved and sculptured human figures of symbolic scenes that tell stories about the happenings in the Battle. Presently, after being repaired it is protected with fence so that tourists have no chances to come closer to the walls of the monument. It is erected few meters apart from Colosseum. A very interesting work of architecture!
Lucas Oliveira Dos Santos (18 months ago)
Nice architecture. I little bit hidden by the the Colosseum.
Александр Бакуменко (2 years ago)
Beautiful arch)))
Martin V Mathew (2 years ago)
The Arch of Constantine (Italian: Arco di Costantino) is a triumphal arch in Rome dedicated to the emperor Constantine the Great. The arch was commissioned by the Roman Senate to commemorate Constantine’s victory over Maxentius at the Battle of Milvian Bridge in AD 312. Situated between the Colosseum and the Palatine Hill, the arch spans the Via triumphalis, the route taken by victorious military leaders when they entered the city in a triumphal procession.  Dedicated in 315, it is the largest Roman triumphal arch, with overall dimensions of.21 m high, 25.9 m wide and 7.4 m deep. It has three bays, the central one being 11.5 m high and 6.5 m wide and the laterals 7.4 m by 3.4 m each. The arch is constructed of brick-faced concrete reveted in marble. @Wikipedia
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