Church tower of Lake Resia

Curon Venosta, Italy

The symbol of Val Venosta is quite fascinating and rather like a fable. A solitary church steeple emerges half out of the clear waters of the 6 km long Resia Lake, against the majestic background of the wild Vallelunga Valley. However, the story behind this postcard-like image is far less idyllic and the romantic 14th Century church bears testimony to the irresponsible decision of the State to locate a dam there after the end of the Second World War.

As from 1922, Fascism had taken hold in Italy, including South Tyrol. In 1939, the Montecatini conglomerate began the construction of a of 22-meter deep dam project in Resia, with complete disregard for the sensibilities and remonstrations of the local South Tyrolean population. Construction was suspended after the outbreak of the War and it was hoped that this would mark the end of the project. But in 1947, just two years after the end of the War and much to the dismay of the local population, Montecatini announced that work on the construction of the dam was to be resumed.By the summer of 1950, it was all over. The locks had been tightened and the water was rising, flooding 677 hectares of land affecting 150 families, half of which were forced to emigrate. Compensation was meagre and the inhabitants of the town of Curon, which was completely flooded, were housed in temporary accommodation – basic shacks located at the entrance of the Vallelunga. The dam was the product of fascism and through it hundreds of families lost the basis of their livelihood.

The half-submerged church steeple in the Resia Lake has since been declared a protected historical artefact, becoming a tourist attraction and thus symbolizing the legacy of old Curon.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

www.vinschgau.net

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

HappyFeet (2 years ago)
A great places of interest to visit where the bell tower of a 14th century church is submerged in the artificial lake.
Holger Schönlau (3 years ago)
Excellent views! Nice water! And lots of things to do around here.
Per Stobbe (3 years ago)
Lake Reschen (Lago di Resia) is an artificial lake in the western portion of South Tyrol, Italy, approximately 2 km south of the Reschen Pass. This pass forms the border with Austria, and 3 km east of the mountain ridge forming the border with Switzerland. With its capacity of 120 million m3 it is the largest lake in the province. Its surface area of 6,6 km² makes it also the largest lake above 1.000 m in the Alps. Max lake dept is 28 meter. The lake is famous for the steeple of a submerged 14th-century church; when the water freezes, this can be reached on foot.
monica chifor (3 years ago)
Lake Resia is the biggest lake of South Tyrol and an artificial reservoir. Up to the year 1950, there were three lakes in this area: Lake Resia, Lake Curon and Lake San Valentino alla Muta. When the reservoir was dammed after the construction of the dam wall (1947-1949), the locality of Curon Venosta as well as much of Resia were flooded and destroyed. The only remnant of old Curon is the steeple, which still towers out of the waters and is nowadays a historical landmark.
P Mozza (3 years ago)
Once you've stayed here, you won't go anywhere else when visiting the area. Great for bikers wanting to get to Stelvio and the food is fantastic.
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