One of Tirol’s true architectural gems is the splendid Cistercian Abbey of Stams, founded in 1273 by Count Meinhard II of Gorizia-Tyrol.

During the 16th-century Protestant Reformation and German Peasants' War the monastic community decayed. In the course of the 1552 rebellion against Emperor Charles V, the premises were plundered by the troops of Elector Maurice of Saxony; even the grave of Maurice' brother Severinus was destroyed. The monastery was largely rebuilt in its present-day Baroque style from the early 17th century onwards, including Wessobrunner stuccowork by Franz Xaver Feuchtmayer.

Set in pristine grounds, the monumental façade is easily recognized by its pair of silver cupolas at the front. The exuberant interiors can be admired within a guided tour: Crane your neck to marvel at ceilings adorned with rich stuccowork and elaborate frescoes and view elaborate iron grilles in the collegiate church. Among the Monastery’s most impressive possessions are Bernardi Hall, the Chapel of the Holy Blood and the “Prelates' Staircase”. Afterwards, you are strongly recommended to visit the Abbey's shop that offers a unique range of goods from homemade jams and honey to distinct monastic drinks and produce.

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Address

Stiftshof 1, Stams, Austria
See all sites in Stams

Details

Founded: 1273
Category: Religious sites in Austria

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Geoff Lodge (26 days ago)
The guide was excellent and the premises amazing.
Zdeno (7 months ago)
Visit at the time of the pandemic, but definitely a nice place to visit.
Neža Vrtovec (10 months ago)
Such a good presentation of all the things, very beautiful building
Hoa Nguyen (11 months ago)
Beautiful museum
Chris Sieber (3 years ago)
Nice stop on the road to Vienna
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