Juval Castle (Italian Castel Juval) is located at the entrance of the Schnalstal valley. It derives its name from the Latin name of the mountain, Mons Jovis (mountain of Jupiter).

The oldest account of the castle dates to 1278, when it was owned by Hugo of Montalban. It was probably constructed about thirty years before the first account referencing it. In 1368, it was acquired by the lords of Starkenberg, and in 1540, it passed to Sinkmoser. The period from its construction to the mid 1500s was the castle's heyday.

After several more changes of ownership, in 1813, it was sold to a local farmer, Josef Blaas. The castle fell into disrepair, until in 1913 William Rowland carefully restored it.

Since 1983, it is the summer residence (July and August) of famous mountaineer Reinhold Messner, who has partially converted it into a museum displaying works of Tibetan art and a collection of masks from five continents. A later restoration of the castle was presided over by Vinschgau architect Karl Spitaler. It is one of the venues of the Messner Mountain Museum. The museum is closed in the summer months, when Messner resides in the castle.

Around the castle there is a path open to the public along which there are informational signs relating to the botanical features on the grounds. For private individuals, the castle is accessible only on foot with an hour-long walk or by using a special bus service.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lars Sp (4 months ago)
This is an absolutely mesmerizing place. Alpinism and Tibetan cultures, hosted in a castle ruin.
Carlos NEVES (6 months ago)
Very interesting place. A lot of beautiful memories from the owner of the place. Didn't know Reinhold Messner before, but he/his story impressed me
Sneezy Fey (3 years ago)
It was a really interesting experience. A glimpse into this man's life. And the castle.... It is amazing what he did to it. A piece is made for tourists, and another kept locked private. It is really amazing. I don't understand german and went with German guide, but I can still say it was amazing. I also experienced a little of Tibet without ever being there :) No pictures in some of the rooms, as they are private. By shuttle from the parking, then about 15min on foot. The landscape is wonderful. In the same building as the toilets there is a small (family business I believe) restaurant where you can order some good food. Really good! I would also recommend going back to parking on foot. 2.5km
Vierka Fliglová (4 years ago)
Wonderful castle with very interesting and unusual religious exponates.
Robert Kraft (5 years ago)
Ok
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.