Juval Castle (Italian Castel Juval) is located at the entrance of the Schnalstal valley. It derives its name from the Latin name of the mountain, Mons Jovis (mountain of Jupiter).

The oldest account of the castle dates to 1278, when it was owned by Hugo of Montalban. It was probably constructed about thirty years before the first account referencing it. In 1368, it was acquired by the lords of Starkenberg, and in 1540, it passed to Sinkmoser. The period from its construction to the mid 1500s was the castle's heyday.

After several more changes of ownership, in 1813, it was sold to a local farmer, Josef Blaas. The castle fell into disrepair, until in 1913 William Rowland carefully restored it.

Since 1983, it is the summer residence (July and August) of famous mountaineer Reinhold Messner, who has partially converted it into a museum displaying works of Tibetan art and a collection of masks from five continents. A later restoration of the castle was presided over by Vinschgau architect Karl Spitaler. It is one of the venues of the Messner Mountain Museum. The museum is closed in the summer months, when Messner resides in the castle.

Around the castle there is a path open to the public along which there are informational signs relating to the botanical features on the grounds. For private individuals, the castle is accessible only on foot with an hour-long walk or by using a special bus service.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Kraft (2 years ago)
Ok
Mihaela Petre (2 years ago)
Amazing surroundings, amazing castle! A place that must be seen!
Maciek Sz. (2 years ago)
Nice place to start a long hike
Christian Holzl (3 years ago)
Haven't been inside. But the location is extraordinary. Looking forwards to visiting inside
Tim Winkler (4 years ago)
i was only enjoying the surroundings/outdoor area, but didn't enter the actual museum. the place itself however was beautiful and cozy. great valley views from the transfer bus stop (just head through the small tunnel near the parking lot)!
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