Stockholm City Museum

Stockholm, Sweden

The Stockholm City Museum documents and exhibits the history of Stockholm. It was opened to the public in 1942 and located in the palace completed in 1685. The museum is the largest municipal museum in Sweden, and houses collections which include 300,000 items of historical interest; 20,000 works of art and 3 million photographs.

The museum has two permanent exhibitions, one called "The Stockholm Exhibition - Based on a true story". The first part of the Stockholm exhibition was opened in 2010. It tells the history of Stockholm from the first sign of settlements until the future ideas of children. It is all about buildings, streets, parks and water as well as of the inhabitants who fills the city with life. At the exhibition you may also find a unique painting of Stockholm during the 17th century. The second part of "The Stockholm Exhibition" was opened in April 2011. It focuses on the later part of the history of Stockholm.

The other permanent exhibition "About houses - Architecture & building preservation in Stockholm" guides the visitor through different historical building styles and show examples from the end of last century until the 1970s. Among kitchen cabinets, wallpapers and door handles, you get knowledge of that which is typical of the times and in many cases worthy of preservation.

Aside from the permanent exhibition and the main exhibitions, the museum most often has a few smaller exhibitions open, such as photographic exhibitions.

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Details

Founded: 1942
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

3.9/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

himanshu mishra (4 years ago)
Beautiful place
Kevin Sorensen (4 years ago)
This is a nice museum in beautiful surroundings
Peter Fletcher (8 years ago)
The topic was interesting but we found a number of the displays were very poor quality. It is clearly geared to local children which is fine and admirable. However as visitors to Stockholm we felt it was not very appealing. Compared to may other museums we have visited including the Vasa Museum it was highly overpriced and not worth the entrance fee.
Susan Huntington (8 years ago)
I was fortunate to spend time at the Stadsmuseum in July, 2012. It is a good place to start before you wander through Gamla Stan. The building has a very interesting history. The Museum Shop is well-stocked with books and educational materials. Replicas of ancient Swedish jewelry are available for sale. I found several guides and maps of the 'old town.' The kind staff of this shop were arranging for a personal tour for a couple whose wife needed a wheelchair. I asked for a history of the museum building and was given 30 minutes of explanation--it has had many incarnations. I enjoyed an excellent exhibit of Raoul Wallenberg while there. My visit ended with the open air lunch at the museum food shop. I am a fan of this place and will return when next in Stockholm.
Stefan Didrik (9 years ago)
More playground then museum...
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