Ulcinj Church-Mosque

Ulcinj, Montenegro

During the rule of the Venetians the Church of St. Maria was built in the Old Town in 1510. It was turned into a Mosque of the Sultan Selim II as soon as the Turks conquered Ulcinj in 1571. It used to be the so-called Xhamia Mbretrore – Imperial Mosque, as it did not have any Wakf from which it could have been financed at the beginning, so that its employees were paid from the state budget.

Hajji Halil Skura added a minaret in 1693 made of nicely cut stone, in the lower part, on a rectangular base, which was made narrower on top. The religious purpose of this mosque ended in 1880, when the Montenegrins liberated Ulcinj. This religious building also had a maktab. All the Ulcinj reises (captains) would gather there when an important decision had to be made.

This building is the most beautiful monument incorporating a combination of the West and the East in the architecture of Ulcinj. It hosts the town museum.

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Details

Founded: 1510
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Recep Bahcivan (13 months ago)
Ottoman mosque
Mahmoud Abdellatif (18 months ago)
One of the Mosques in Ulcinj just in front of the public sandy beach
Ahmed G. A. Gammo (3 years ago)
One of the first mosques in continental Europe. One of the locals told me that it was built after some locals converted to Islam after trading with some muslim Algerian traders who sail the Mediterranean. It was destroyed in the first world war. The Muslim Association in Montenegro started rebuilding it in 2008. The mosque reopened 1st June 2012.
Robert S (4 years ago)
Sunni Mosque next to Mala Plaza Beach. Muslims in Ulcinj Municipality are mostly of Albanian origins.
mizanur rahman (4 years ago)
Most ancient Mosque in Montinegro. Establish year is unknown but rebuild in 2003
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