Budva City Museum

Budva, Montenegro

The museum in Budva Old Town, located in an early 19th century building, has a permanent exhibition of its archaeological and ethnographic collections, while the ground floor of the museum boasts a lapidarium featuring valuable stone exhibits.

The archaeological collection includes the many objects discovered during archaeological excavations in Budva (Hellenic gold, different types of vases, jewellery, ornaments, tools, and cutlery, glass and clay objects, silver dishes etc) of various sites dating back to the 5th century BC, which combine the cultures of the Greeks, Romans, Byzantines and Slavs in this region. Especially valuable are a pair of gold earrings and a brooch with an engraving of an eagle with a little boy in his claws, which is associated with the Greek myth of Zeus and Ganymede.

The ethnographic collection includes a large number of exhibits from this region dated between the 18th and early 20th centuries. The archaeological collection boasts over 1,200 relics and the ethnological collection of more than 450 different exhibits.

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Budva, Montenegro
See all sites in Budva

Details

Founded: 19th century
Category: Museums in Montenegro

More Information

www.budva.travel

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Afonso p (2 years ago)
Not really a museum (no information about the fort itself, and an enclosed library thats just a jam of books, without much in respect to the montenegrin culture...a small ship models expo but with a great deal of ships out of context (spanish and british ships which never travelled this waters) but rather a 360 panoramic viewpoint. The entrance fee is just for the views I guess.
Alinne F. Bertolin (2 years ago)
It's small but nice museum. A lot informations about the history and how the power about Budva territory change along the time. Nice collection of objects from greek, roman and Slavic domination.
Gabriela Tomkova (2 years ago)
The Citadel was quite a disappointment. The museum is just a small dark room full of models of ships - not a museum actually. The library is rather a parody of a historical library - there are plastic chairs and books such as "Excel 2003" etc. When we were there, there were water pipes everywhere and someone was even hanging out their washing there. There is no information about history, foundation or end of the building at all. The only positive is the view of the town - but hey, for 3.50 euro?!
ig for (2 years ago)
3.5e for entrance. Nothing inside but restaurant with strange service and expensive vines but incredible seaview
Kamil OsiƄski (2 years ago)
Unfortunately they charge for the entrance. Nothing really to see inside. Nice view from the top. I'd give 4 stars but there are Stella Artois umbrellas :(
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