St. John's Church

Budva, Montenegro

St. John's Church is one of the oldest churches in the Montenegro coastal region, which was built, according to oral tradition, in the 7th century. It was a Cathedral until 1828, when the Diocese of Budva was abolished. The Cathedral was damaged in the earthquake of 1667, after which it was reconstructed on several occasions, while its high tower, which dominates the town, was erected in 1867. Next to the church, there is the former Bishop’s court complex.

The church features several objects of cultural and historical value and, among its numerous old Icons, the most notable is one of the Virgin Mary with Christ called the Madonna in Punta. It is also known as the Madonna of Budva or the Great Panagia (“the saint of all that is holy”). In 1807, it was brought from the Church of Santa Maria in Punta and is now considered to be the shrine of the Patron Saint of the town and its inhabitants, protecting them both from plague and pirate raids. In the 1970s, the original classical altar was removed from the church, and a new altar wall – a mosaic made of mural glass covering an area of 40 square metres – was created by the well-known Croatian painter, Ivo Dulcic.

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Budva, Montenegro
See all sites in Budva

Details

Founded: 7th century
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

More Information

www.budva.travel

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gokhan Orucu (3 years ago)
Cool place
Robert S (3 years ago)
Beautiful church in the centre of Budva Old Town.
Adam Nikshiqi (3 years ago)
Simple bit beautiful cathedral in the old town of Budva.
Montenegro Tour guide (4 years ago)
Cathedral on one of the most beautiful squares at old city of Budva.. very nice to visit ..simple but beautiful
Piotr Cisek (4 years ago)
It's worth seeing indeed.
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