St. John's Church

Budva, Montenegro

St. John's Church is one of the oldest churches in the Montenegro coastal region, which was built, according to oral tradition, in the 7th century. It was a Cathedral until 1828, when the Diocese of Budva was abolished. The Cathedral was damaged in the earthquake of 1667, after which it was reconstructed on several occasions, while its high tower, which dominates the town, was erected in 1867. Next to the church, there is the former Bishop’s court complex.

The church features several objects of cultural and historical value and, among its numerous old Icons, the most notable is one of the Virgin Mary with Christ called the Madonna in Punta. It is also known as the Madonna of Budva or the Great Panagia (“the saint of all that is holy”). In 1807, it was brought from the Church of Santa Maria in Punta and is now considered to be the shrine of the Patron Saint of the town and its inhabitants, protecting them both from plague and pirate raids. In the 1970s, the original classical altar was removed from the church, and a new altar wall – a mosaic made of mural glass covering an area of 40 square metres – was created by the well-known Croatian painter, Ivo Dulcic.

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Budva, Montenegro
See all sites in Budva

Details

Founded: 7th century
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

More Information

www.budva.travel

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Reneeke9 (8 months ago)
Its a church, what do you want me to say. Take your cap of and don't make loud noices.
Игорь Барчук (8 months ago)
Here is preserved old ages ambience with modern life inside: there are a lot of boutiques, restaurants and cafes. However all that was organized and combined in such manner to not to spoil ancient beauty.
Булат Хакимов (8 months ago)
One of the few Montenegro churches you can actually get in. It is quite simple and has just a set of icons to see. But the mosaics style of the altar wall is unusual and could be worth paying this church a visit. Especially with a free entrance.
Сергей Зайченко (10 months ago)
What is a need to ring through night time? After that one hate the Church even more
cesur Uçar (10 months ago)
Don't wait too much. Seems newly restorated. Not original paintings
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