Kotor Cathedral

Kotor, Montenegro

The Cathedral of Saint Tryphon in Kotor is one of two Roman Catholic cathedrals in Montenegro. It was built in honor of Saint Tryphon, the patron and protector of the city, on the same site where an older church had already existed long ago. That earlier church was built in 809 by Andrija Saracenis, a citizen of Kotor, where the remains of the saint were kept after being brought from Constantinopole.

The cathedral was consecrated on 19 June 1166. Compared to other buildings, the Kotor Cathedral is one of the largest and most ornate buildings in Kotor. The cathedral was seriously damaged and rebuilt after the 1667 Dubrovnik earthquake, but there were not enough funds for its complete reconstruction.

The April 1979 Montenegro earthquake, which completely devastated the Montenegro coast, also greatly damaged the cathedral. Luckily, it has been salvaged and the careful restoration of parts of its interior has not been completed until a few years ago. The Romanesque architecture, contains a rich collection of artifacts. Older than many famous churches and cathedrals in Europe, the cathedral has a treasury of immense value. In its interior there are frescoes from the 14th century, a stone ornament above the main altar in which the life of St Tryphon is depicted, as well as a relief of saints in gold and silver.

The collection of art objects includes a silver hand and a cross, decorated with ornaments and figures in relief. It is only a part of the valuable objects of the Treasury of this unique sacral building which was the City Hall in the past. Today, it is the best known tourist attraction in Kotor and a symbol of the city: the Saint is depicted in the city's coat of arms, along with a lion and the Mount of San Giovanni.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Kotor, Montenegro
See all sites in Kotor

Details

Founded: 1166
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anita (2 years ago)
Very beautiful Catholic church with incredible art and statues. There’s a museum upstairs as well—very cool with ancient artifacts (think 12th century A.D.), paintings, and even relics hidden in cabinets in a chapel closed off by an iron gate. From the upstairs balcony, you can look out over the plaza below.
ying chua (2 years ago)
We visited Kotor and the Cathedral in Oct 2015. Its older than the Notre Dame it houses a museum inside.
jekson hutabarat (2 years ago)
very interesting and beautiful old building very happy to walk around the rocky path
Edmond Zsolt Etlinger (2 years ago)
Nothing special, but if you are Kotor anyway, it's worth a few minutes.
Jonard (2 years ago)
The Cathedral is located within the old city of Kotor and beside everything else I’m going to mention one interesting fact, the Cathedral of St. Tryphon in the Old Town, which is 69 years older than the Notre Dame in Paris and astounding 460 years older than the Basilica of St. Peter in Rome!
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Tyniec Abbey

Tyniec Benedictine abbey was founded by King Casimir the Restorer probably around 1044. Casimir decided to rebuild the newly established Kingdom of Poland, after a Pagan rebellion and a disastrous Czech raid of Duke Bretislaus I (1039). The Benedictines, invited to Tyniec by the King, were tasked with restoring order as well as cementing the position of the State and the Church. First Tyniec Abbot was Aaron, who became the Bishop of Kraków. Since there is no conclusive evidence to support the foundation date as 1040, some historians claim that the abbey was founded by Casimir the Restorer’ son, King Boleslaw II the Generous.

In the second half of the 11th century, a complex of Romanesque buildings was completed, consisting of a basilica and the abbey. In the 14th century, it was destroyed in Tatar and Czech raids, and in the 15th century it was rebuilt in Gothic style. Further remodelings took place in the 17th and 18th centuries, first in Baroque, then in Rococo style. The abbey was partly destroyed in the Swedish invasion of Poland, and soon afterwards was rebuilt, with a new library. Further destruction took place during the Bar Confederation, when Polish rebels turned the abbey into their fortress.

In 1816, Austrian authorities liquidated the abbey, and in 1821-1826, it was the seat of the Bishop of Tyniec, Grzegorz Tomasz Ziegler. The monks, however, did not return to the abbey until 1939, and in 1947, remodelling of the neglected complex was initiated. In 1968, the Church of St. Peter and Paul was once again named the seat of the abbot. The church itself consists of a Gothic presbytery and a Baroque main nave. Several altars were created by an 18th-century Italian sculptor Francesco Placidi. The church also has a late Baroque pulpit by Franciszek Jozef Mangoldt.