Kotor Cathedral

Kotor, Montenegro

The Cathedral of Saint Tryphon in Kotor is one of two Roman Catholic cathedrals in Montenegro. It was built in honor of Saint Tryphon, the patron and protector of the city, on the same site where an older church had already existed long ago. That earlier church was built in 809 by Andrija Saracenis, a citizen of Kotor, where the remains of the saint were kept after being brought from Constantinopole.

The cathedral was consecrated on 19 June 1166. Compared to other buildings, the Kotor Cathedral is one of the largest and most ornate buildings in Kotor. The cathedral was seriously damaged and rebuilt after the 1667 Dubrovnik earthquake, but there were not enough funds for its complete reconstruction.

The April 1979 Montenegro earthquake, which completely devastated the Montenegro coast, also greatly damaged the cathedral. Luckily, it has been salvaged and the careful restoration of parts of its interior has not been completed until a few years ago. The Romanesque architecture, contains a rich collection of artifacts. Older than many famous churches and cathedrals in Europe, the cathedral has a treasury of immense value. In its interior there are frescoes from the 14th century, a stone ornament above the main altar in which the life of St Tryphon is depicted, as well as a relief of saints in gold and silver.

The collection of art objects includes a silver hand and a cross, decorated with ornaments and figures in relief. It is only a part of the valuable objects of the Treasury of this unique sacral building which was the City Hall in the past. Today, it is the best known tourist attraction in Kotor and a symbol of the city: the Saint is depicted in the city's coat of arms, along with a lion and the Mount of San Giovanni.

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Kotor, Montenegro
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Founded: 1166
Category: Religious sites in Montenegro

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Anita (10 months ago)
Very beautiful Catholic church with incredible art and statues. There’s a museum upstairs as well—very cool with ancient artifacts (think 12th century A.D.), paintings, and even relics hidden in cabinets in a chapel closed off by an iron gate. From the upstairs balcony, you can look out over the plaza below.
ying chua (10 months ago)
We visited Kotor and the Cathedral in Oct 2015. Its older than the Notre Dame it houses a museum inside.
jekson hutabarat (11 months ago)
very interesting and beautiful old building very happy to walk around the rocky path
Edmond Zsolt Etlinger (12 months ago)
Nothing special, but if you are Kotor anyway, it's worth a few minutes.
Jonard (18 months ago)
The Cathedral is located within the old city of Kotor and beside everything else I’m going to mention one interesting fact, the Cathedral of St. Tryphon in the Old Town, which is 69 years older than the Notre Dame in Paris and astounding 460 years older than the Basilica of St. Peter in Rome!
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