Lagaholm Castle Ruins

Laholm, Sweden

Where the old road to Halmstad crosses Lagan lies Lagaholm’s castle ruin. Lagaholm castle was built in the 1200s and was demolished in the 1600s by order of the king, Karl XI. In the 1930s the ruins were dug out and restored. Now Sydkraft’s operating centre, salmon farm and power station lie on the area. Sydkraft’s exhibition and slide show give a historical flashback to the importance of Lagaholm during the Middle Ages as a stronghold between Sweden and Denmark.

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Address

Lagavägen 2, Laholm, Sweden
See all sites in Laholm

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Ruins in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

visitlaholm.se

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Fredrik Holmqwist (16 months ago)
Trevlig Park med slotts grunden kvar
dennis granheimer (16 months ago)
Fint ställe, väldigt häftigt att se hur ett vattenkraftverk fungerar
Leon Krizman (17 months ago)
nice place
Kim Norrgren (18 months ago)
Nostalgic for a man as me. Many memories
Joakim Ölund (18 months ago)
Easy to overlook. Interesting site with castle ruin, fishfarm and power station.
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