St. Mary's Church

Helsingborg, Sweden

Maria (St. Mary's) Church is one of the oldest buildings in Helsingborg. The construction of the church started in the beginning of the 14th century and finished some hundred years later. The place, where the Maria church is standing today, has though been holy ever since people inhabited the area. In the end of the 12th century a little stone church was build in a Romance style, in the place were Maria church stands today.

The exterior of Maria church is a good example of the Danish Brick Gothic style, which is characteristic to the Scandinavian buildings of the 14th century. The church has a form of three naves basil, though the high mid nave misses the characteristic flow of light.

The two of the church's four clocks come from the St. Petri Church that has been destroyed by reformists in the 16th century. If you visit the church, don't miss the triptych from the 15th century, the hoard of silver in the basement of the vestry and a plague for the famous composer Dietrich Buxtehude - an organist at the Maria Church in the 17th century.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Saidi Mwishehe Kienda (8 months ago)
My favorite place
Tamara Dag (14 months ago)
The heart of city with a lot of restaurants around. Unfortunatelly close on Sunday evening.
shennilyn arquillano (15 months ago)
Great interior
kryniao (19 months ago)
Interesting place. It is worth stopping and calm down.
David Gullmak (23 months ago)
One of the most beautiful church choirs I have sung in.
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