Kärnan is a medieval tower, the only part remaining of a larger Danish fortress which controlled the entrance to the Baltic Sea.

The origins of the fortress is disputed but Danish legend places its origin to the reign of the legendary King Fróði. However, this legend has not been supported by archaeological proof. Dendrochronological dating has shown that the core was built in the 1310s, when Eric VI of Denmark was King of Denmark. It was considered the most important fortress in Denmark, and was integral in securing control over the strait between Scania and Zealand.

It was surrendered to Sweden along with the rest of Skåneland as part of the Treaty of Roskilde in 1658. The fortress was retaken by Danish forces in 1676 during the Scanian War, and its capture celebrated by flying a giant Flag of Denmark above it. This flag was later captured by the Swedish army and is preserved in the Army Museum (Armémuseum) in Stockholm. The fortress returned to Swedish control by the Treaty of Lund in 1679. Charles XI of Sweden ordered most of it demolished fearing that it was too exposed to a sneak attack from Denmark. The only thing that was saved for posterity was the old medieval tower core. The tower continued to serve as a landmark for shipping through Øresund.

The castle was restored starting during 1893-94, under instructions from Oscar Ferdinand Trapp, a Swedish businessman and engineer (1847–1916). Architect for the restoration was Josef Alfred Hellerström (1863–1931), Helsingborg city architect from 1903 to 1928. The objective of the restoration was to restore, to the extent possible, the appearance the structure had based upon the oldest known medieval illustration. The building's crenellation dates from these repairs.

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Details

Founded: 1310s
Category: Castles and fortifications in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jesper (3 years ago)
The symbol for the city of Helsingborg. A must for tourists. The top gives a very scenic few over the strait and downtown.
Walaa El-Din Abdallah (3 years ago)
It is a wonderful surrounding, unfortunately the tower is closed for maintenance till spring 2019
Ian Cutting (3 years ago)
Great view and informative. Information in Swedish and English.
Paul O'Connor (3 years ago)
It's always great to see history being preserved. Even if it is only a small part of what was once there. Good work.
Erik Krantz (3 years ago)
Interesting and fascinating about the history of Kärnan and Helsingborg. Once you reach the top of the tower you will have a good understanding of the history, and you will be rewarded with a spectacular view of Helsingborg. If you are there with young kids, also be sure to visit the playground in the park next to the tower, clearly visible from the top.
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