Strindberg Museum

Stockholm, Sweden

The Strindberg Museum (Strindbergsmuseet) is dedicated to the writer August Strindberg and located in his last dwelling, in the house he nicknamed the "Blå tornet" (The Blue Tower). The Museum is owned by the Strindberg Society of Sweden and was inaugurated in 1973.

Strindberg moved to the house in 1908 and lived there until his death in 1912. The Museum consists of Strindberg's flat and library, as well as an area for temporary exhibitions. Wallpapers and other decorations have been reconstructed in accordance with how the flat looked at the time the writer lived there, but furniture and other details are original.

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Details

Founded: 1973
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Evgeny Nikolaev (2 years ago)
Perfect place for a short visit
Sesame Clyde (2 years ago)
Very interesting exhibition. Small, but lots off information to spend a few cosy hours learning about this great writer. Staff is very friendly and helpful and entry is only 75 kr (~ 8€)!
Liance (2 years ago)
Great museum on the Swedish author and playwright August Strindberg. The residential building is amazing in itself with a working ornate art deco lift and stairwell. The museum is split into two sections. One half explores Strindberg's work and life (with space for temporary exhibitions), while the other half is a restored museum of the beautiful apartment he spent the last four years of his life in. There is also his reconstructed library on the sixth floor. My only complaint is that there were not sufficient enough English translations, with only one per section and not for individual items.
Mac Cat (3 years ago)
Had the good luck to get a free guided one hour tour, very interesting though mr Strindberg only lived here for 4 years. It has been reconstructed by collecting his furniture from different relatives. One person recorded and made drawings of the way it was when Stringdberg died as a Swedish hero working for the labor party and female rights for voting. The exhibition is well organized along a timeline, also his different works in different areas, novels, drama, paintings, chemical experiments etc. Most of it in a dark psychic background. Situated at the north end of Drottninggatan. Recommended.
Meredith Isis (3 years ago)
Very comprehensive. Lived the apartment especially the sound effects. Lots of info, nicely presented. Lots in English and booklet
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