Strindberg Museum

Stockholm, Sweden

The Strindberg Museum (Strindbergsmuseet) is dedicated to the writer August Strindberg and located in his last dwelling, in the house he nicknamed the "Blå tornet" (The Blue Tower). The Museum is owned by the Strindberg Society of Sweden and was inaugurated in 1973.

Strindberg moved to the house in 1908 and lived there until his death in 1912. The Museum consists of Strindberg's flat and library, as well as an area for temporary exhibitions. Wallpapers and other decorations have been reconstructed in accordance with how the flat looked at the time the writer lived there, but furniture and other details are original.

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Details

Founded: 1973
Category: Museums in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rick J (2 years ago)
One of the smaller museums in Stockholm is the Strindberg museum, which is located at the far end of the shopping street Drottninggatan, and it is housed in the late laureate's apartment in a building from the early 1900. The museum begins with a tour through his apartment as it was when he lived there and then continues throughout the different periods in his life and focus on different areas of his views. There is also a small cinema showing documentaries about his life. Overall a small but interesting museum for a rainy day, the museum will take about an hour to go through if you spend some time at the exhibits
Marica Jakobsson (2 years ago)
The museum was pleasant. The receptionist was incredibly rude. She was engaged in a personal phone call. She didn't look up or bade me farewell. I've heard that this museum is privately owned. Take care in looking after the visitors! The information on Google hasn't mentioned the increase in the ticket rise.
S K (2 years ago)
Cramped and small. Interesting but not much to see. I saw both floors of the museum which is 2 old apartments and it took me less than 15 min. Still worth a short visit.
Stella (4 years ago)
It was a fantastic experience to be in the very place where the writer lived his final years. But for a foreign visitor it was annoying that most of the descriptions of his work, painting and e.t.c. was in the Swedish language. Very few labels was in English and I would like to read all of the information was given. I told that to the officer. At least it should have a smaller ticket for tourists since we could gather and comprehend the written details. August Strindberg is a major writer for the European literature and it would be wonderful if it will be treated that way, then a Swedish writer. Thank you for your time!
Åke Söderqvist (4 years ago)
Great place to visit if you like Swedish culture and litteratur.
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