Théâtre Antique

Vaison-la-Romaine, France

Théâtre Antique is a Roman age a mphitheatre in Vaison-la-Romaine, near other significant Roman ruins. It was built around the year 20 AD, due to the marble statue of the Emperor Tiberius was found in front of the royal entrance to the Theatre. It is thought that the stage wall came to 25 meters high, with a depth of 8 meters and a width of 23 meters. In 1912, many sculptures were found in the twelve pits which had been built to house stage machinery. These sculptures can now be seen at the Théo Desplans Museum. The Theatre leans against the hillside, and today is used for Vaison's annual festival. It holds an audience of 5000 during the Festival performances.

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Details

Founded: 20 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in France
Historical period: Roman Gaul (France)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jonathan Gat (5 years ago)
So beautiful
gregoire silvius (5 years ago)
ancient Roman theater discovered in the 1910s
James Morrison (5 years ago)
Such an interesting place. Would love to go to a concert there!
Terrence Pellikaan (5 years ago)
Historic site with museum about ancient Roman times. There is an audio tour available though we found out later (it was not offered). The site itself explains mostly in French which is offending to us foreign tourists.
Adriana Gadioli Tarone (5 years ago)
Teatro bem conservado e ainda usado pelos habitantes da região. Nos faz sentir na Roma antiga!
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