Palais des Papes

Avignon, France

The Palais des Papes is one of the largest and most important medieval Gothic buildings in Europe. Once a fortress and palace, the papal residence was the seat of Western Christianity during the 14th century. Six papal conclaves were held in the Palais, leading to the elections of Benedict XII in 1334, Clement VI in 1342, Innocent VI in 1352, Urban V in 1362, Gregory XI in 1370 and Antipope Benedict XIII in 1394.

The palace construction began in AD 1252. Avignon became the residence of the Popes in 1309, when the Gascon Bertrand de Goth, as Pope Clement V, unwilling to face the violent chaos of Rome after his election (1305), moved the Papal Curia to Avignon, a period known as the Avignon Papacy.

The Palais is actually two joined buildings: the old palace of Benedict XII, which sits on the impregnable rock of Doms, and the new palace of Clement VI, the most extravagant of the Avignon popes. Together they form the largest Gothic building of the Middle Ages, it is also one of the best examples of the International Gothic architectural style. The construction design was the work of two of France’s best architects, Pierre Peysson and Jean du Louvres and the lavish ornamentation was the work of two of the best students of the School of Siena, Simone Martini and Matteo Giovanetti.

In addition, the papal library housed in the palace (the largest in Europe at the time with over 2,000 volumes), attracted a group of clerics passionate in the study, amongst the future founders of Humanism, Petrarch. At the same time, composers, singers and musicians were drawn to the Great Chapel. It was there that Clement VI appreciated the Mass of Notre-Dame de Guillaume de Machault, there that Philippe de Vitry at the pope’s invitation presented his Ars Nova and there that Johannes Ciconia came to study.

Due to its immense size, the Palais was also the place where the general organisation of the Church began to change. It facilitated the centralisation of services and the adaption of operations in order to suit the needs of the papacy, creating a truly central administration for the Church. The manpower of the Curia (Church administration), while 200 at the end of the 13th century, surpassed 300 at the beginning of the 14th century and reached 500 people in 1316. To this were added over 1,000 lay officials working within the palace.

Despite this, the Palais became obsolete when the papacy found it necessary to return to Rome. The hope of reuniting Latin and Orthodox Christians, along with the achievement of peace in the Papal States in Italy, made the case of returning stronger. Added to that was the strong conviction of both Urban V and Gregory XI that the seat of the papacy could only be the tomb of St Peter. Despite strong opposition from the Court of France and the College of Cardinals, both popes found the means to return to Rome, the first, on 30 April 1362, the second on 13 September 1370. This time, the return was absolute.

In the following centuries, the palace lost all of its former glory, despite it serving as the seat of two anti-popes and many cardinals. It retained, however, a “work of destruction” aspect that French poets and writers have referred to over the centuries, with its powerful sense of beauty, simplicity, grandeur and immortality.

Since 1995, the Palais des Papes has been classified, along with the historic center of Avignon, as a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Details

Founded: 1252
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in France
Historical period: Late Capetians (France)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Conrad Barnard (5 months ago)
The Palace of the Popes is incredible in its size and presence. Even as a non Roman Catholic I found the palace to have a significant weight to it. The detail in the building is something to marvel at. Kids- The I Pad tour guide provided at the palace created an interactive experience that the kids enjoyed especially the virtual treasure hunt.
Jack Ellery (5 months ago)
Incredible historic building, I've never seen anything else like it. Everything is very well presented and the electronic tour guide on the iPad is great! Lots of information about the history is available to read.
Kristin Gossett (7 months ago)
A beautiful landmark to tour. The AR experience provided with easy to carry tablets makes it easy to imagine how the palace may have felt when it was inhabited and filled with dining guests. The stairs may be difficult for less mobile guests to navigate, but the grounds are still impressive even if you are not able to explore all of the nooks and crannies. There is a small coffee shop on the top providing a beautiful view and opportunity to rehydrate.
Angelina Magpie (7 months ago)
Great historical memorial. Good exposition inside. Great guide that makes the tour suitable for kids. We’ve had a great cultural and historical experience here. Would recommend visiting if you’re a fan of that stuff.
left dock (7 months ago)
The unique Pope palace has a long history. Do your homework if you want to be updated, use the 3d vr glasses for unique effect inside the palace, or watch the amazing light show on the walls, during the summer, where the story of the many forms and reforms of the palace is shown. Plan your trip for a complete tour and walk on the famous half destroyed, bridge of Avignon. A hot spot for the tourists, combined with the extraordinary theater festival "Off", during July, attracts thousands of people. Look out for the "In" shows, and exhibitions, taking place inside the palace court. Beautiful gardens and great view from the top, take your time to relax and enjoy.
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