Avignon Cathedral

Avignon, France

Avignon Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop. The cathedral is a Romanesque building, built primarily in the second half of the 12th century. The bell tower collapsed in 1405 and was rebuilt in 1425. In 1670-1672 the apse was rebuilt and extended.

The building was abandoned and allowed to deteriorate during the Revolution, but it was reconsecrated in 1822 and restored by the archbishop Célestin Dupont in 1835-1842. The most prominent feature of the cathedral is a gilded statue of the Virgin Mary atop the bell tower which was erected in 1859.

The interior contains many works of art. The most famous of these is the mausoleum of Pope John XXII (died 1334), a 14th-century Gothic carving. It was moved in 1759, damaged during the Revolution, and restored to its original position in 1840. The cathedral was listed as a Monument historique in 1840.

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Details

Founded: 1670-1672
Category: Religious sites in France

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

W M (2 years ago)
A magical place to be. It is hard to imagine how they built such an incredible monument back then. It is no wonder a UNESCO site.
Michael Williams (2 years ago)
A moving Mass; beautiful Cathedral overlooking the walled city.
Yennifer Cufino (2 years ago)
It’s worthy to come to this place, it is quiet, with a nice energy and an nice architecture.
Anthony (2 years ago)
Very well kept church next to the Palais de Papes
Nila Silvana (2 years ago)
This place are next to palais de papes avignon, very big and last time i come the nuns was praying with beautiful singing becaiuse the arcithecture of this building are very good. From outside there is a statue who will receipt the last light from the sun.
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