Avignon Cathedral

Avignon, France

Avignon Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop. The cathedral is a Romanesque building, built primarily in the second half of the 12th century. The bell tower collapsed in 1405 and was rebuilt in 1425. In 1670-1672 the apse was rebuilt and extended.

The building was abandoned and allowed to deteriorate during the Revolution, but it was reconsecrated in 1822 and restored by the archbishop Célestin Dupont in 1835-1842. The most prominent feature of the cathedral is a gilded statue of the Virgin Mary atop the bell tower which was erected in 1859.

The interior contains many works of art. The most famous of these is the mausoleum of Pope John XXII (died 1334), a 14th-century Gothic carving. It was moved in 1759, damaged during the Revolution, and restored to its original position in 1840. The cathedral was listed as a Monument historique in 1840.

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Founded: 1670-1672
Category: Religious sites in France

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4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

michał sternik (3 months ago)
marvelous to be there
hleiss (3 months ago)
Beautiful church near the Palais des Papes.
left dock (5 months ago)
It's an emblematic cathedral that poses for thousands of pictures avec le pont d'Avignon, both symbols of the city.
Luka Mitrovic (14 months ago)
The beauty that most be visited if you are in Avignon.
Luka Mitrovic (14 months ago)
The beauty that most be visited if you are in Avignon.
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