The Museum of Medieval Stockholm

Stockholm, Sweden

The Museum of Medieval Stockholm was constructed around old monuments excavated in an extensive archaeological dig in the late 1970s. Part of Stockholm's city wall, dating from the early 16th century, was also found. The museum enables visitors to experience medieval Stockholm, with its brick houses and booths, workshops, harbour and gallows. It relates the medieval history of the city from the 1250s to the 1520s. In 2010, to celebrate 800 years since the birth of Birger Jarl, the founder of Stockholm, the museum opened an exhibition with a reconstruction of his face.

The Museum of Medieval Stockholm produces theme exhibitions with a medieval emphasis and arranges lectures, symposia and programmes. It engages in broad educational activities, in which children, youth and schools are a key target group. The museum has a shop that sells books relating to the Middle Ages, and also postcards and jewelry.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details


Category: Museums in Sweden

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Olga P (2 years ago)
Very nice museum although a bit small. It has a lot of children and I think for them it is a bit more interesting. Basically shows how gamla Stan was in the medieval times, if you want to learn about that time in more detail visit the Swedish history museum which is also free! For being free it's worth a visit.
Elena K (2 years ago)
We went there only because it was our second visit to Stockholm and everything we wanted was already seen, and free entrance of course :))) But with audio guide it was interesting and informative. Very nice and helpful staff.
Per Nyhlin (2 years ago)
There is no admission fee for visitors to the Stockholm Medieval Museum . Located between the Royal Castle and House of Parliament this museum might be an interesting stop. Perfect for visitors in the age 3-103Y old/young. My kids loved the place. PLEASE NOTE: You must take the stairs (or elevator) down to the waterfront when you are standing on the bridge. The museum is actually located UNDER the bridge. The museum is fairly small, but packed with interesting information connected to Stockholm's history. Inside the museum you will find both mini models and full scale models of the old settlement, buildings, ships, armory, knights etc etc. There is also a workshop area for the kids, where they can sit down and paint, draw or build their own models of dragons etc. At the entrance you will find the museum shop with souvenirs, books etc. The restrooms are very clean and you can store away your belongings in lockers during the stay. Guided tours (30 minutes) are offered and audio equipment can be borrowed if you prefers to walk the museum in your own pace.
Litta S (2 years ago)
To begin with, it’s free to visit this place. It wasn’t easy to locate it at first through google maps but we managed by asking somebody. There were friendly staff to greet us. The place is maintained well, authentic atmosphere and true to its purpose of displaying its rich history. Highly recommended.
Keith Hanlan (2 years ago)
This is a a great small museum which does a fabulous job describing the medieval origins of Stockholm. It is free and well worth a couple hours of your time. Note that it is easily missed as the entrance is down a flight of stairs on the bridge opposite the north side of palace. The small sunken park and pond here is generally a quiet place to rest and have a bag lunch.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Narikala Castle

Narikala is an ancient fortress overlooking Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, and the Kura River. The fortress consists of two walled sections on a steep hill between the sulphur baths and the botanical gardens of Tbilisi. On the lower court there is the recently restored St Nicholas church. Newly built in 1996–1997, it replaces the original 13th-century church that was destroyed in a fire. The new church is of 'prescribed cross' type, having doors on three sides. The internal part of the church is decorated with the frescos showing scenes both from the Bible and history of Georgia.

The fortress was established in the 4th century and it was a Persian citadel. It was considerably expanded by the Umayyads in the 7th century and later, by king David the Builder (1089–1125). Most of extant fortifications date from the 16th and 17th centuries. In 1827, parts of the fortress were damaged by an earthquake and demolished.