Gallerie dell'Accademia

Venice, Italy

The Gallerie dell'Accademia is a museum gallery of pre-19th-century art in Venice. The former Accademia di Belle Arti di Venezia was founded in 1750. In 1807 the academy was re-founded by Napoleonic decree and moved to the Palladian complex of the Scuola della Carità, where the Gallerie dell'Accademia are still housed. The collections of the Accademia were first opened to the public in 1817.

The Gallerie dell’Accademia contains masterpieces of Venetian painting up to the 18th century, generally arranged chronologically though some thematic displays are evident.

The gallery contains masterpieces for example from  Canaletto, Carpaccio, Tintoretto, Titian and Leonardo da Vinci (Drawing of Vitruvian Man).

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Founded: 1750
Category: Museums in Italy

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jean Reeve (2 years ago)
A treasure trove of glorious art. The building itself is a wonder. Highly recommended.
Jaevie Dulay (2 years ago)
We visited during the renovation so one of the rooms we wanted to visit was closed to the public. Make sure to visit their website as they have a document that lists the paintings available for viewing. There are guides in some rooms so you can learn more about the art that are displayed and even the rooms themselves. It was interesting to know that the Vitruvian man is in the archive of this museum and only displayed every 5 years.
Luis Cintron (2 years ago)
Totally in love with the Gallerie dell’Accademia! This experience was magical! The surroundings were whispering history in every corner and the environment was pulling you in, like if you’d have already been there... like if you belonged there!
Linda Whiting (2 years ago)
Opted to pay for the hand held guide. Difficult to hear and no information given about why certain subjects and scenes were painted. Would have been useful to have been given more background information. The art on display was all very similar. There is only so much culture you can take before you need another drink.
Simone Franceschin (2 years ago)
Beautiful renaissance museum, you'll find several masterpieces by Tintoretto, Tiziano, Giorgione and many others. If you're visiting Venice in 2019 it's a must do. It's 500 years since Tintoretto's birth and special exhibitions are all over town and of course in the museum. You'll love it.
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