Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari

Venice, Italy

The Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, usually just called the Frari, is one of the greatest churches in Venice. The Franciscans were granted land to build a church in 1250, but the building was not completed until 1338. Work almost immediately began on its much larger replacement, the current church, which took over a century to build. The campanile, the second tallest in the city after that of San Marco, was completed in 1396.

The imposing edifice is built of brick, and is one of the city's three notable churches built in the Italian Gothic style. As with many Venetian churches, the exterior is rather plain. The interior contains the only rood screen still in place in Venice.

Titian, the most important member of the 16th-century Venetian school of painting, is interred in the Frari.

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Founded: 1338
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tracy Saxton (2 years ago)
Words are hard to describe the beauty and sanctity of this Basilica. It is a special place that must be seen to appreciate. Don't miss it if you travel to Venice.
George Dragomir (2 years ago)
Must visit if you are in Venice. Beautiful architecture and important art works inside.
Natalie Denton (2 years ago)
A beautiful and Picturesque place to visit. Very Sareen with beautiful architecture. We spent quite a while walking around it’s a very interesting place to be. I would thoroughly recommend a visit. You can just soak in the atmosphere and feel just her old is this building is. I can’t wait to visit this place again.
Yaddy Ramos (2 years ago)
Extraordinary place... very relaxing and full of painting.. many details on the ceiling and all around.
Edward Counsell (2 years ago)
Seems strange to review somewhere like this. I mean, it's an ancient church in the heart of Venice and full of fine art. It's going to be good if that's your thing.
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