Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari

Venice, Italy

The Basilica di Santa Maria Gloriosa dei Frari, usually just called the Frari, is one of the greatest churches in Venice. The Franciscans were granted land to build a church in 1250, but the building was not completed until 1338. Work almost immediately began on its much larger replacement, the current church, which took over a century to build. The campanile, the second tallest in the city after that of San Marco, was completed in 1396.

The imposing edifice is built of brick, and is one of the city's three notable churches built in the Italian Gothic style. As with many Venetian churches, the exterior is rather plain. The interior contains the only rood screen still in place in Venice.

Titian, the most important member of the 16th-century Venetian school of painting, is interred in the Frari.

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Founded: 1338
Category: Religious sites in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Cristiana Bonamico (5 months ago)
A very nice surprise for us. Recommended.
Burkhard Vogel-Kreykenbohm (10 months ago)
Very helpful small leaflet is given at the entrance to guide you to the church. Please note that as of fall 2020 the altar is replaced by a replica due to restoration
Margie Porthouse (11 months ago)
Monteverdi is buried here. There's some stunning sculpture on the various tombs. The Doge's tomb, next to Canova (also beautiful), was my favorite because of its age and the stunning four Atlases. The whole place is a real find and we doffed our caps at the big M.
Simone Montalbano (11 months ago)
One of first churches if coming from the train station, worthy a visit of 20/30 mins
Natasha Montes (13 months ago)
Beautiful church with a lot entrance fee of 3 euros. Recommend to pay a visit if you are passing by ?
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