Basilica di San Giovanni e Paolo

Venice, Italy

The Basilica di San Giovanni e Paolo is one of the largest churches in Venice with the status of minor basilica. After the 15th century the funeral services of all of Venice's doges were held here, and twenty-five doges are buried in the church.

The huge brick edifice was designed in the Italian Gothic style, and completed in the 1430s. It is the principal Dominican church of Venice, and as such was built to hold large congregations. It is dedicated to John and Paul, not the Biblical Apostles of the same names, but two obscure martyrs of the Early Christian church in Rome, whose names were recorded in the 4th century but whose legend is of a later date.

In 1246, Doge Jacopo Tiepolo donated some swampland to the Dominicans after dreaming of a flock of white doves flying over it. The first church was demolished in 1333, when the current church was begun. It was not completed until 1430.

The vast interior contains many funerary monuments and paintings, as well as the Madonna della Pace, a miraculous Byzantine statue situated in its own chapel in the south aisle, and a foot of Saint Catherine of Siena, the church's chief relic.

The Renaissance Equestrian Statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni (1483), by Andrea del Verrocchio, is located next to the church.

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Details

Founded: 1430s
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rick Deruet (14 months ago)
The church is not free but the price worth to visite it. Very lovely
Jake Nong (14 months ago)
A classical church with Venetian sculptures, nice and majestic entrance.
Rajneesh Kumar Giri (15 months ago)
Awesome and mesmerizing. Venice is one of the most beautiful cities in this world and it was a great pleasure going around and having some beautiful time spent there. The entire city is base on water streams and you get many boats and gondola to go around and explore this City. It is cleaned and beautiful and very well organised. You can get boats for internal rides as well as rides to the nearby islands too..!! Overall a must visit in Italy..!!
Edward Going (16 months ago)
Italy is the absolute best for art and sculpture. The people are so friendly Loved it!
Nicola Persic (2 years ago)
The "Basilica dei Santi Giovanni e Paolo" is one of the most important medieval religious monuments in the entire city of Venice. It's considered to be the "Pantheon" of Venice as many Doges have been buried here. It's an amazing Gothic beauty. It's definitely worth a visit!
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