Scuola Grande di San Rocco

Venice, Italy

The Scuola Grande di San Rocco is noted for its collection of paintings by Tintoretto, generally agreed to include some of his finest work.

In January 1515 the project of the building was entrusted to Bartolomeo Bon, although some authorities assign it to his son Pietro Bon. In 1524 his work was continued by Sante Lombardo, who, in turn, three years later was replaced by Antonio Scarpagnino. Following his death in 1549, the last architect to work on the edifice was Giangiacomo dei Grigi, finishing in September 1560.

In 1564 the painter Tintoretto was commissioned to provide paintings for the Scuola, and his most renowned works are to be found in the Sala dell'Albergo and the Sala Superiore. All the works in the building are by him, or his assistants, including his son Domenico: they were executed between 1564 and 1587. Works in the sala terra are in homage to the Virgin Mary, and concentrate on episodes from her life. In the sala superiore, works on the ceiling are from the Old Testament, and on the walls from the New Testament. Together, they show the biblical story from Fall to Redemption.

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Details

Founded: 1515
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jordan Modell (6 months ago)
Lower Your expectations and you'll be fine. It's really only one floor. But there are a lot of nice things to see on that floor. Not sure it was really worth €13 but it also felt good to contribute as it's a non-for profit
Don Lowe (6 months ago)
The Scuola Grande Din San Rocco is one of the most historical decorated building in Venice This place was build during the 16th century. this a two story building, But only 3 halls are allowed visit by public.
Jelena Lapickaja (7 months ago)
I was absolutely lucky to attend "Four Seasons" Vivaldi's concert in Venice. This was a unique opportunity to hear a beautiful Italian music in a building which walls heard real composers. Unbelievable, very intimate, if you will only have a chance, please use it and enjoy every minute of it.
Ault Nathanielsz (7 months ago)
Astonishingly large masterpieces by Tintoretto. The real goes are upstairs. Use one of the mirrors (provided for free) to really appreciate the work on the ceiling.
philippe michalik (11 months ago)
Awesome place, really amazing. The entrance fee is kinda expensive (10euros as of November 2018) but I found it really worth it! The paintings and sculptures are breathtaking and huge. Do it without hesitation. You are provided a little booklet explaining the different paintings, and you can grab some mirrors in order to easily look at the ceiling.
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