Scuola Grande di San Rocco

Venice, Italy

The Scuola Grande di San Rocco is noted for its collection of paintings by Tintoretto, generally agreed to include some of his finest work.

In January 1515 the project of the building was entrusted to Bartolomeo Bon, although some authorities assign it to his son Pietro Bon. In 1524 his work was continued by Sante Lombardo, who, in turn, three years later was replaced by Antonio Scarpagnino. Following his death in 1549, the last architect to work on the edifice was Giangiacomo dei Grigi, finishing in September 1560.

In 1564 the painter Tintoretto was commissioned to provide paintings for the Scuola, and his most renowned works are to be found in the Sala dell'Albergo and the Sala Superiore. All the works in the building are by him, or his assistants, including his son Domenico: they were executed between 1564 and 1587. Works in the sala terra are in homage to the Virgin Mary, and concentrate on episodes from her life. In the sala superiore, works on the ceiling are from the Old Testament, and on the walls from the New Testament. Together, they show the biblical story from Fall to Redemption.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1515
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giovanni Ruotolo (29 days ago)
Words can’t describe it! Totally unexpected but still paralyzed for being able to explore a place such that. Living the history at the fullest.
IMtrigirl (2 months ago)
Was definitely worth the visit. Highly recommend the audio guide too or you won't know what you're looking at. Beautiful place, rich history, fantastic works of art!!
Jogi Mauger (3 months ago)
This is a must to put on your list to visit. The ceilings, the carvings, the history. All incredible!
Travel Guide (7 months ago)
The Audioguides are great and informative, the place is just magical and worth visiting for sure! And also not expensive at all 1.50-2.00€
Vinay Kulkarni (7 months ago)
Lovely amazing show of art. Mesmerizing. Must visit this museum.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.