Santa Maria Formosa

Venice, Italy

Santa Maria Formosa was erected in 1492 under the design by Renaissance architect Mauro Codussi. It lies on the site of a former church dating from the 7th century, which, according to tradition, was one of the eight founded by San Magno, bishop of Oderzo. The name 'formosa' relates to an alleged appearance of the Holy Virgin disguised as a voluptuous woman.

The plan is on the Latin cross, with a nave and two aisles. The two façades were commissioned in 1542, the Renaissance-style one facing the channel, and 1604, the Baroque one facing the nearby square.

The artworks in the interior include the St. Barbara polyptych by Palma the Elder, one of his most celebrated works. The Conception Chapel houses a triptych of Madonna of Misericordia by Bartolomeo Vivarini (1473), while in the Oratory is the Madonna with Child and St. Dominic by Giambattista Tiepolo (18th century). There is also a Last Supper by Leandro Bassano.

The dome of the church was rebuilt in after falling during an earthquake in 1688.

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Address

Castello 5255, Venice, Italy
See all sites in Venice

Details

Founded: 1492
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Abodunrin Folorunso (18 months ago)
A beautiful place of worship.
ian Manchester (19 months ago)
Another place in Venice worth a visit
DAVID SNYDER (2 years ago)
Beautiful works of art in this important church.
Oleg Naumov (3 years ago)
Excellent monument of medieval culture and architecture. Together with the square it composes wonderful architectural ensemble.
Димитър Несторов (3 years ago)
You should circle around to get inside from the correct door. Impressive otherwise.
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