The Non Basilica del Santissimo Redentore, commonly known as Il Redentore, dominates the skyline of the island of Giudecca. It was built as a votive church in thanksgiving for deliverance from a major outbreak of the plague that decimated Venice between 1575 and 1576, in which some 46,000 people (25–30% of the population) died. The Senate of the Republic of Venice commissioned the architect Andrea Palladio to design the votive church. Though the Senate wished the Church to be square plan, Palladio designed a single nave church with three chapels on either side. Its prominent position on the Canale della Giudecca gave Palladio the opportunity to design a facade inspired by the Pantheon of Rome and enhanced by being placed on a wide plinth.

The cornerstone was laid by the Patriarch of Venice Giovanni Trevisano on May 3, 1577 and the building was consecrated in 1592. At the urgent solicitations of Pope Gregory XIII, after consecration the church was placed in charge of the Order of Friars Minor Capuchin. A small number of Friars reside in the monastery attached to the church.

Il Redentore has one of the most prominent sites of any of Palladio's structures, and is considered one of the pinnacles of his career. It is a large, white building with a dome crowned by a statue of the Redeemer. On the façade a central triangular pediment overlies a larger, lower one. This classical feature recalls Palladio's façade for San Francesco della Vigna, where he used an adaptation of a triumphal arch. Palladio is known for applying rigorous geometric proportions to his façades and that of Redentore is no exception. The overall height is four-fifths that of its overall width whilst the width of the central portion is five-sixths of its height.

It has been suggested that there are some Turkish influences in the exterior, particularly the two campaniles which resemble minarets.

Interior

As a pilgrimage church, the building was expected to have a long nave, which was something of a challenge for Palladio with his commitment to classical architecture. The result is a somewhat eclectic building, the white stucco and gray stone interior combines the nave with a domed crossing in spaces that are clearly articulated yet unified. An uninterrupted Corinthian order makes its way around the entire interior.

Art work

Il Redentore contains paintings by Francesco Bassano, Lazzaro Bastiani, Carlo Saraceni, Leandro Bassano, Palma the Younger, Jacopo Bassano, Francesco Bissolo, Rocco Marconi, Paolo Veronese, Alvise Vivarini and the workshop of Tintoretto. The sacristy also contains a series of wax heads of Franciscans made in 1710.

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Venice, Italy
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Founded: 1577-1592
Category: Religious sites in Italy

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

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Grant Bremner (7 months ago)
The Chiesa del Santissimo Redentore (English: Church of the Most Holy Redeemer), commonly known as Il Redentore, is a 16th-century Roman Catholic church located on Giudecca (island) in the district of Dorsoduro, in the city of Venice, Italy. It was designed by Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio. You can see it from quite some distance away and as you get nearer you can appreciate how big it is.
JAHIDUL ISLAM (12 months ago)
Church in venice
Jim Cook (20 months ago)
An incredibly beautiful 16th century Catholic church in Venice that you should visit. It is available to see from afar when one enters Venice via boat.
Pierluigi Consorti (2 years ago)
All churches in Venice are very interesting. But although Italian law does not permit it, an entrance ticket is required. That is not good and in my opinion it is to boycott this requirement.
Kelvin Thomas (2 years ago)
A short boat ride from St Marks square, lovely place to visit. Worth paying the few euros to take the lift up to the bell tower. Views are spectacular. Very peaceful and serene.
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