Skogskyrkogården

Stockholm, Sweden

Skogskyrkogården (“The Woodland Cemetery”) is a cemetery founded in 1917. Its design reflects the development of architecture from national romantic style to mature functionalism. Skogskyrkogården came about following an international competition in 1915 for the design of a new cemetery in Enskede. The design of the young architects Gunnar Asplund and Sigurd Lewerentz was selected. Work began in 1917 on land that had been old gravel quarries that were overgrown with pine trees and was completed three years later. The architects' use of the natural landscape created an extraordinary environment of tranquil beauty that had a profound influence on cemetery design throughout the world.

The crematorium, with its remarkable Faith, Hope, and Holy Cross Chapels was Gunnar Asplund's final work of architecture, opened shortly before his passing in 1940. In 1994, Skogskyrkogården was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site. At the Tallum Pavilion, visitors can see an exhibition about the cemetery and the story of its origins and the two architects whose vision created it.

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Chia-Lun Wu (13 months ago)
Big park and nice view.
Tristan Pollock (2 years ago)
Incredibly beautiful and serene land. You can walk quietly through the woods, hills and architecture in a way that is thoughtful to the human eye and ear. Pay attention to every sense and do a walking meditation as you discover this stunning final resting place.
Anna-Maria Zowal (2 years ago)
Quiet, peaceful, graceful. Well persevered and well taken care of. Worth seeing, definitely. It force you to stop and think...
Nils Höhmann (2 years ago)
There's a reason this particular cemetery became a UNESCO world heritage site. It was the first cemetery of its kind. Not only where to store the dead - it was built first and foremost for us still living. Visit. Feel it.
Jason Wheeler (2 years ago)
Wonderful that they have gone to so much effort to preserve this final resting place for most people of Stockholm. Its massive and world heritage listed.
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