Skogskyrkogården

Stockholm, Sweden

Skogskyrkogården (“The Woodland Cemetery”) is a cemetery founded in 1917. Its design reflects the development of architecture from national romantic style to mature functionalism. Skogskyrkogården came about following an international competition in 1915 for the design of a new cemetery in Enskede. The design of the young architects Gunnar Asplund and Sigurd Lewerentz was selected. Work began in 1917 on land that had been old gravel quarries that were overgrown with pine trees and was completed three years later. The architects' use of the natural landscape created an extraordinary environment of tranquil beauty that had a profound influence on cemetery design throughout the world.

The crematorium, with its remarkable Faith, Hope, and Holy Cross Chapels was Gunnar Asplund's final work of architecture, opened shortly before his passing in 1940. In 1994, Skogskyrkogården was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site. At the Tallum Pavilion, visitors can see an exhibition about the cemetery and the story of its origins and the two architects whose vision created it.

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User Reviews

Babatunde Anifowoshe (11 months ago)
A cemetery with a bit of class ? it was amazing how the forest is converted into a cemetery very good initiative...wanted to go all round the graves but It was cold and getting dark ☺ so I had to leave before I started to see ghost ? ? ? I will definitely visit again
Amorfati Trips (11 months ago)
The Woodland Cemetery (Skogskyrkogården) in Stockholm, Sweden, is a quiet and dignified place that unites people of different origins and religions to the final rest.
Spyros Kontostanos (12 months ago)
Great place to pause & observe
Spyros Kontostanos (12 months ago)
Great place to pause & observe
Joakim Forsberg (13 months ago)
A must-visit place on all saints day. Peaceful and claim.
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