Villa Emo was designed by Andrea Palladio in 1559 for the Emo family of Venice and remained in the hands of the Emo family until it was sold in 2004. The building was the culmination of a long-lasting project of the patrician Emo family of the Republic of Venice to develop its estates at Fanzolo. 

Since 1996, it has been conserved as part of the World Heritage Site 'City of Vicenza and the Palladian Villas of the Veneto'. 

Emo is one of the most accomplished of the Palladian Villas, showing the benefit of 20 years of Palladio's experience in domestic architecture. It has been praised for the simple mathematical relationships expressed in its proportions, both of the elevation and the dimensions of the rooms. In 1570 Palladio published a plan of the villa in his treatise I Quattro Libri dell'Architettura.

The exterior is simple, bare of any decoration. In contrast, the interior is richly decorated with frescoes by Giovanni Battista Zelotti, who also worked on Villa Foscari and other Palladian villas.

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Founded: 1559
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Italy

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

jose manuel pagés madrigal (2 years ago)
Unique place to feel the atmosphere if these kind of architectures
Sascha Berlin (3 years ago)
A nice local site to visit but I wouldn't consider a ride of more than 30 minutes with it. The garden is well maintained and allows for a relaxed stroll. The villa itself looks much better from the front than from the backside, it would be nice if it were in good shape all around. The frescos inside a really beautiful.
mundo aureo (3 years ago)
Entrance 10, 7,5 (reduced). There is a combined ticket with Villa Maser (I highly recommend it! This one is even better!). Nice frecoes. Interesting architecture.
Paul Kozak (3 years ago)
Great Villa to visit. Explanations of all the frescoes are written in many languages in each room which is really nice to be able to look at them and read. Would be nice to have more explanations about the architecture of the villa. The grounds are very impressive. Have Wi-Fi around the gift shop which is a nice addition. They also provide parking across the street a short walk away from the villa. went in off-season. I can imagine that in the summer it's extremely busy and crowded. Overall worth visiting
Robert V (3 years ago)
One of Palladio's most beautiful and harmonious structures. Well preserved frescoes by Zelotti. Very rewarding for the informed visitor. Perfectly pleasant for the unprepared.
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