Château de Liettres

Liettres, France

Château de Liettres was probably built some years before 1479 by Sir Simon de Luxembourg, provost of the church of Saint-Omer. In that year it was burned by the progressing army of Maximilian I of Austria.

In 1542 Liettres Castle was again burned and partly destroyed by the troops of the Duke of Vendome. Shortly thereafter the castle was bought by Jean de Zomberghe after which it remained in the hands of his descendants.

Liettres Castle was built on an artificial plot of dry ground in the marshy valley of the La Laquette stream which also fed its moats. During the course of centuries it underwent several transformations. In 1720 the main building was rebuilt. It consists of several buildings forming a square with strong cylindrical towers. It has walls of 2.5 meters up to 5 meters thick in some towers.

At present the castle is privately owned and inhabited.

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Founded: 1470s
Category: Castles and fortifications in France

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