Church of Our Lady Evangelistria

Mystras, Greece

Church of Our Lady Evangelistria is one of the Byzantine churches in the Archaeological Site of Mystras, an UNESCO World Heritage Site. The domed, cross-in-square, two-column church decorated with wall paintings dates from beginning of the 15th century. The few original frescoes still survive.

Comments

Your name



Address

Unnamed Road, Mystras, Greece
See all sites in Mystras

Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Greece

More Information

whc.unesco.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Manolis Akoumianakis (3 years ago)
Στον δρόμο που οδηγεί από τον Άγιο Δημήτριο στη Μονή Βροντοχίου, (στην Κάτω Πόλη του Μυστρά), είναι κτισμένος ο μικρός, κομψός ιερός ναός της Ευαγγελίστριας. Η οικοδόμησή του θα μπορούσε να τοποθετηθεί στις αρχές του 15ου αιώνα, με βάση την αρχιτεκτονική του συγγένεια με τους ναούς της Περιβλέπτου και της Αγίας Σοφίας, τις τοιχογραφίες του και τον γλυπτό του διάκοσμο. Γύρω του υπάρχουν τάφοι και οστεοφυλάκια, που δείχνουν ότι χρησίμευε ως κοιμητηριακός ναός. Κατά τη διάρκεια της Τουρκοκρατίας δεν μετατράπηκε σε τζαμί και παρέμεινε στα χέρια των χριστιανών. Αρχιτεκτονικά ο ναός είναι απλός δικιόνιος σταυροειδής εγγεγραμμένος, με νάρθηκα στα δυτικά. Στη νότια πλευρά του νάρθηκα σχηματίζεται στοά από όπου ξεκινά σκάλα που οδηγεί στον όροφο. Στα ανατολικά της στοάς υπάρχει μικρό τετράπλευρο παρεκκλήσιο, που πιθανόν να αποτελούσε τη βάση κωδωνοστασίου. Νότια της στοάς αυτής μάλλον υπήρχε άλλη στοά, καθώς σώζεται τύμπανο μεγάλου τόξου με πλούσια κεραμοπλαστική διακόσμηση. Δυτικά του νάρθηκα σχηματίζεται θολωτό δωμάτιο, πιθανότατα οστεοφυλάκιο μεταγενέστερης περιόδου. Στα ανατολικά οι αψίδες είναι κτισμένες σύμφωνα με το συνηθισμένο ελλαδικό πλινθοπερίκλειστο σύστημα, όπως επίσης και οι κεραίες του σταυρού και το τύμπανο του τρούλου. Ο ναός διακρίνεται για τον ιδιαίτερα πλούσιο γλυπτό διάκοσμο στο εσωτερικό του, αντιπροσωπευτικό δείγμα της τέχνης του Μυστρά, με ξεχωριστό ενδιαφέρον, καθώς άλλα γλυπτά έχουν δυτικά διακοσμητικά στοιχεία και άλλα βρίσκονται κοντά στη βυζαντινή παράδοση. Από το αρχικό μαρμάρινο τέμπλο, που σήμερα έχει αντικατασταθεί με κτιστό, διατηρείται το επιστύλιο και το περιθύρωμα της Ωραίας Πύλης. Από τον τοιχογραφικό διάκοσμο, ο οποίος ανάγεται στις αρχές του 15ου αιώνα, διατηρούνται σε κακή κατάσταση, ελάχιστα ίχνη, στον τρούλο και στο Ιερό Βήμα.
Vasilis Xrysikakis (3 years ago)
Όμορφη εκκλησία!
PANAGIOTIS ANTONIADIS (3 years ago)
Saltets G (3 years ago)
Anton Tsanis (3 years ago)
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Royal Palace of Naples

Royal Palace of Naples was one of the four residences near Naples used by the Bourbon Kings during their rule of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies (1734-1860): the others were the palaces of Caserta, Capodimonte overlooking Naples, and the third Portici, on the slopes of Vesuvius.

Construction on the present building was begun in the 17th century by the architect Domenico Fontana. Intended to house the King Philip III of Spain on a visit never fulfilled to this part of his kingdom, instead it initially housed the Viceroy Fernando Ruiz de Castro, count of Lemos. By 1616, the facade had been completed, and by 1620, the interior was frescoed by Battistello Caracciolo, Giovanni Balducci, and Belisario Corenzio. The decoration of the Royal Chapel of Assumption was not completed until 1644 by Antonio Picchiatti.

In 1734, with the arrival of Charles III of Spain to Naples, the palace became the royal residence of the Bourbons. On the occasion of his marriage to Maria Amalia of Saxony in 1738, Francesco De Mura and Domenico Antonio Vaccaro helped remodel the interior. Further modernization took place under Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies. In 1768, on the occasion of his marriage to Maria Carolina of Austria, under the direction of Ferdinando Fuga, the great hall was rebuilt and the court theater added. During the second half of the 18th century, a 'new wing' was added, which in 1927 became the Vittorio Emanuele III National Library. By the 18th century, the royal residence was moved to Reggia of Caserta, as that inland town was more defensible from naval assault, as well as more distant from the often-rebellious populace of Naples.

During the Napoleonic occupation the palace was enriched by Joachim Murat and his wife, Caroline Bonaparte, with Neoclassic decorations and furnishings. However, a fire in 1837 damaged many rooms, and required restoration from 1838 to 1858 under the direction of Gaetano Genovese. Further additions of a Party Wing and a Belvedere were made in this period. At the corner of the palace with San Carlo Theatre, a new facade was created that obscured the viceroyal palace of Pedro de Toledo.

In 1922, it was decided to transfer here the contents of the National Library. The transfer of library collections was made by 1925.

The library suffered from bombing during World War II and the subsequent military occupation of the building caused serious damage. Today, the palace and adjacent grounds house the famous Teatro San Carlo, the smaller Teatrino di Corte (recently restored), the Biblioteca Nazionale Vittorio Emanuele III, a museum, and offices, including those of the regional tourist board.