Despot's Palace

Mystras, Greece

The Palace of the Despots dominates the Upper Town of Mystra. It is a great complex of buildings belonging to different times of construction. They started to be built by the Franks, possibly by Guillaume de Villehardouin, and were completed by the Byzantines (the Despot was usually a son or brother of the Emperor). 

These palace constitutes a great example of the Byzantine architecture. The whole building complex is L-shaped and has been well-preserved until our days. The palace has four constructions. Some of them have 4 storeys, while others are two-storey mansions. The first building was the residence of the noblemen and the second one was the throne hall.

The Despot used to live in the fourth building, a four-storey construction dating from 1350-1400. The fifth building, built in the 15th century, was the palace of the Paleologos family. All buildings have numerous arches, chambers, attics and cellars. The exterior area is quite austere.

References:

Comments

Your name



Address

Unnamed Road, Mystras, Greece
See all sites in Mystras

Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Greece

More Information

www.greeka.com
whc.unesco.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nacho Boza (4 months ago)
Currently closed for renovations
Xristoforos Makrakis (6 months ago)
Amazing medieval palace built in the 13th century. It housed Byzantine Emperors after the sack of Constantinople from the Latins and also housed Despots from Morea after the fall of Constantinople to the Ottoman Turks.
Tobi Rückner (13 months ago)
Nice Ancient Place. Palace is for the moment under reconstruction.
Tobi Rückner (13 months ago)
Nice Ancient Place. Palace is for the moment under reconstruction.
Abz Al (15 months ago)
A beautiful archaeological treat in the heart of mystra
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Caerleon Roman Amphitheatre

Built around AD 90 to entertain the legionaries stationed at the fort of Caerleon (Isca), the impressive amphitheatre was the Roman equivalent of today’s multiplex cinema. Wooden benches provided seating for up to 6,000 spectators, who would gather to watch bloodthirsty displays featuring gladiatorial combat and exotic wild animals.

Long after the Romans left, the amphitheatre took on a new life in Arthurian legend. Geoffrey of Monmouth, the somewhat imaginative 12th-century scholar, wrote in his History of the Kings of Britain that Arthur was crowned in Caerleon and that the ruined amphitheatre was actually the remains of King Arthur’s Round Table.

Today it is the most complete Roman amphitheatre in Britain.