Varberg Radio Station

Varberg, Sweden

The Grimeton VLF transmitter in Vargerg is a VLF transmission facility, which has the only workable machine transmitter in the world. It has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The transmitter was built in 1922 to 1924; to operate at 17.2 kHz, although it is designed for frequencies around 40 kHz. The radiating element is a wire aerial hung on six 127-metre high freestanding steel pylons, that are grounded.

The Grimeton VLF transmitter location is also used for shortwave transmissions, FM and TV broadcasting. For this purpose, a 260 metre high guyed steel framework mast was built in 1966 next to the building containing the 40 kHz transmitter.

In 1945 the Grimeton VLF transmitter's twin station Nadawcza Radiostacja Transatlantycka Babice in Babice, Poland was destroyed. Until the 1950s, the Grimeton VLF transmitter was used for transatlantic radio telegraphy to Radio Central in Long Island, New York, USA. From the 1960s until 1996 it transmitted orders to submarines in the Swedish Navy.

In 1968 a second transmitter was installed which uses the same aerial as the machine transmitter but with transistor and tube technology. The machine transmitter become obsolete in 1996 and went out of service. However, because it was still in good condition it was declared a national monument and can be visited during the summer.

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Address

Grimeton 73, Varberg, Sweden
See all sites in Varberg

Details

Founded: 1922-1924
Category:
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Nic (Girlmixalot) (5 months ago)
Broadcast on Xmas was great. Impressive stuff. Would love to visit the station one day.
Jesper R (9 months ago)
Really interesting and much more things to do and see than expected. Worth a detour for sure.
Max Schmidt (11 months ago)
Great for radio enthusiasts! A huge installation.
Noora Routasuo (12 months ago)
Interesting and good quality exhibition, but fairly small. Fun activities, some included in entrance ticket and some not.
Johan Becker (16 months ago)
Free to see a world heritage and be able to walk around and inspect the enormous radio antennas? Count me in! It even had a nice and fresh playground!
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