Varberg Radio Station

Varberg, Sweden

The Grimeton VLF transmitter in Vargerg is a VLF transmission facility, which has the only workable machine transmitter in the world. It has been declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The transmitter was built in 1922 to 1924; to operate at 17.2 kHz, although it is designed for frequencies around 40 kHz. The radiating element is a wire aerial hung on six 127-metre high freestanding steel pylons, that are grounded.

The Grimeton VLF transmitter location is also used for shortwave transmissions, FM and TV broadcasting. For this purpose, a 260 metre high guyed steel framework mast was built in 1966 next to the building containing the 40 kHz transmitter.

In 1945 the Grimeton VLF transmitter's twin station Nadawcza Radiostacja Transatlantycka Babice in Babice, Poland was destroyed. Until the 1950s, the Grimeton VLF transmitter was used for transatlantic radio telegraphy to Radio Central in Long Island, New York, USA. From the 1960s until 1996 it transmitted orders to submarines in the Swedish Navy.

In 1968 a second transmitter was installed which uses the same aerial as the machine transmitter but with transistor and tube technology. The machine transmitter become obsolete in 1996 and went out of service. However, because it was still in good condition it was declared a national monument and can be visited during the summer.

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Address

Grimeton 73, Varberg, Sweden
See all sites in Varberg

Details

Founded: 1922-1924
Category:
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Erik B (2 years ago)
This was soo cool, they actually were closed but they gave me a tour anyway. Showing me around the old station and telling me about the history. It made it all so much better! So thank you for the tour and all the information! I had a great time!
Per Lundin (2 years ago)
Good piece of history well worth a visit if you're around Varberg. I found the coolest part how fast development has come in wireless communication after seeing this 'beast'.
Jan Igerud (2 years ago)
Great place to see technical history about radion, they have a very nice museum and enthusiastic guides
Ana Silva (2 years ago)
This place is advisable for radio fans. Well provided with café and toilet facilities. It was nice to sit outside! The personal is very friendly and they even let you try to catch some radio waves!
Hans Hammarquist (2 years ago)
This is how a restoration should be done. You will see what an, actual functioning, radio station look like in 1924. You will also experience the troubles they had to get through in order to be able to build a radio station in those days. There are complete copies of the correspondence that took place including from the surrounding farmer's that feared that the radio waves would effect their cows' milk production. I think this is the place I will say is the most important place of it's time to visit.
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