Herrenhausen Gardens

Hanover, Germany

The Herrenhausen Gardens are a heritage of the Kings of Hanover. The Great Garden has always been one of the most distinguished baroque formal gardens of Europe while the Berggarten has been transformed over the years from a simple vegetable garden into a large botanical garden with its own attractions. Both the Georgengarten and the Welfengarten have been made in the style of English gardens, and both are considered popular recreation areas for the residents of Hanover. The history of the gardens spans several centuries, and they remain a popular attraction to this day.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category:
Historical period: Thirty Years War & Rise of Prussia (Germany)

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Sydney Van Guelder (18 months ago)
So beautiful, it's needed a whole day to explore all this amazing garden, very impressive indeed
Žilvinas Atkočiūnas (18 months ago)
As a first time Hannover visitor I liked every moment being here. Especially at spring (blossom time)
Nicole Linn (20 months ago)
Wonderful afternoon spent waking in the gardens. Tickets were really affordable and children under 12 enter free. Very picturesque even for a visit in February
Garry Lim (20 months ago)
This is a beautiful place with a lot of history. I dont think pictures can fully describe how picturesque this enormous backyard is. It's also too bad I came to visit in the winter, as I'm sure the gardens would be doubly lush and colorful in the summer. A great way to spend an hour or two on dates or family outings. I would suggest bringing a picnic and exploring the nooks and crannies in this place.
Annemarie Moore (2 years ago)
Rather dull in winter. However the formal gardens are remarkable and extensive. The large fountains were turned off (presumably for winter) but they looked as if they would be spectacular in the summer. Children will enjoy the maze
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