Marktkirche

Hanover, Germany

The Marktkirche St. Georgii et Jacobi (Market Church of Sts. George and James), commonly known as Marktkirche, was built in the 14th century. Together with the nearby Old Town Hall it is considered the southernmost example of the North German brick gothic architectural style. The roof and the vaults of the naves were destroyed in an air raid in 1943 and restored in 1952.

The church is a hallenkirche (hall church). Above the nave and two aisles rises a monumental saddleback roof. The high western tower was a symbol for the power and the wealth of the citizens of the town. It is still one of the highest towers in Lower-Saxony and a landmark of the city.

The main altar was carved of linden wood, around 1480. The front depicts the Passion of Christ in 21 scenes, following models of Martin Schongauer. The back shows scenes from the lives of the two patron saints, Saint George and Saint James. The altar was moved to the Aegidienkirche in 1663 to make room for a Baroque altar. In 1856 it was taken to the Welfenmuseum and thus was not destroyed during World War II. It was returned to the Marktkirche in 1952.

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Details

Founded: 14th century
Category: Religious sites in Germany
Historical period: Habsburg Dynasty (Germany)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Lien Tran (2 years ago)
Beautiful historical place for wandering around
Fares Al-Huri (2 years ago)
Altstadt, a must see in Hannover and in any contemporary metropolitan city really!
phhpro (2 years ago)
one of many interesting churches in town
Ramya Gurusamy (3 years ago)
Walk through and feel the architecture and travel back experience..
Abraham Ayanwale (3 years ago)
A timely reminder of the past and the need to live harmously without chaos. We need peace not war
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