There has been a wooden church in Källa since the 11th century. After it was destroyed by fire, and with increasing attacks from Baltic invaders, a new church of stone - with the aspect of a fortress - was constructed in stages was built in the 13th century. The two-storied construction, dedicated to St. Olav, was very unusual and made for defensive purposes.

The Källa Church fell into disrepair when a new church was built here in the nineteenth century, but has now been taken into the care of the National Heritage Board and is a major tourist attraction. The most valuable of the old Källa Kyrka's furnishings, including the 15th-century triptych carving and the pulpit from 1600, were moved to the new church.

In the churchyard many of the huge old flat gravestones date from the 1600's and 1700's. Older graves have been discovered from the 11th and 12th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Tom Karlsson (3 months ago)
Ett fantastiskt besök.
Pontus Thedvall (6 months ago)
Great 12th century church, worth visiting. The historical architectural changes is pretty interesting to learn. They have miniatures inside the church depicting it's architectural evolution. What is most impressive is the high walls.... The church dual roled as a watchtower from 1170 to 1240. The entrance fee to enter the church is only 2€ per person and children are free. I recommend a visit!!
Göran Hedblad (7 months ago)
En fin gammal kyrka som har guidade visningar vissa dagar, sevärd och mycket väl bevarad,
Andreas Exler (7 months ago)
Ein schöner Ort. Leider am Montag geschlossen.
Le Feu aux poudres (2 years ago)
Good place to meet ghost between old graves some are dated from the 12th century!!! Church was closed we didn't see the runic stone inside. The sacrifice source is just a little pit.
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