Källa Old Church

Löttorp, Öland, Sweden

There has been a wooden church in Källa since the 11th century. After it was destroyed by fire, and with increasing attacks from Baltic invaders, a new church of stone - with the aspect of a fortress - was constructed in stages was built in the 13th century. The two-storied construction, dedicated to St. Olav, was very unusual and made for defensive purposes.

The Källa Church fell into disrepair when a new church was built here in the nineteenth century, but has now been taken into the care of the National Heritage Board and is a major tourist attraction. The most valuable of the old Källa Kyrka's furnishings, including the 15th-century triptych carving and the pulpit from 1600, were moved to the new church.

In the churchyard many of the huge old flat gravestones date from the 1600's and 1700's. Older graves have been discovered from the 11th and 12th centuries.

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Details

Founded: 13th century
Category: Religious sites in Sweden
Historical period: Consolidation (Sweden)

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joseph Yang (2 years ago)
It was built in 1100s. An interesting find on Öland.
Amorfati Trips (4 years ago)
Källa old church, or deserted church, is built of limestone in the 12th century. It was abandoned after about 750 years when the risk for rockfall was too big. If you're lucky, the church is open but it is also well worth a visit from the outside. Read more about our visit to Öland at amorfatitrips.com
Jerker Åberg (5 years ago)
Nice place to stop by for a short visit. Easy to get to.
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