Solliden Palace was completed in 1906. The Italian-style country house was designed by Torben Grut. Today it is owned by King Carl XVI Gustav of Sweden and used as the royal summer residence. Solliden palace is open to the public from May to September.

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Details

Founded: 1906
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Sweden
Historical period: Modern and Nonaligned State (Sweden)

Rating

4.1/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rudy Otten (11 months ago)
Super nice. Old style place with good ambiance.
Heidi Mueller (12 months ago)
Lovely gardens, cozy little gift shop with beautiful things and great food places especially the bakery and delicatessen shop. Didn't manage to eat in the restaurant but the food on the plates looked fabulous. If you come on Victoriadagen, the birthday of crown princess Victoria, you will meet a very down to earth and friendly Royal family.
M Mara (12 months ago)
Great botanical gardens! Lovely atmosphere really. So much work accomplished to take care of those gardens during those hot months of summer. Well done!!! Lovely staff at the shops and restaurant. Will definitely go back !
Susanna Bärgård (13 months ago)
Summer Castle of the Swedish Royal family. Lovely garden and Italian palace style house. Also exhibitions yearly of some royal theme/history.
Floflo Eriksson (13 months ago)
Simply amazing,we went here just few days ago...so many gardening ideas,so beautiful gardens..it's indeed a paradise..so close to nature and very good food.
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